Bachelor of Environment Management

The Environment Sciences and Management Programme is designed to train students to orientate their perception of environmental challenges in order to appreciate the key role of sciences, economics, ethics, politics, and sociology in environmental conservation and management. The programme provides students with a firm science foundation, and training in application of scientific principles to identify, analyse, interpret and generate solutions to environmental issues. In doing so, a new cadre of environmental professionals will emerge to confront the current environmental challenges at local and international levels.

 

With this degree, students will be well prepared for careers in private and government agencies, educational institutions, and private consulting firms. Some titles associated with these jobs include: Environmental Scientist, Environmental Microbiologist, Environmental Chemist, Environmental Lawyer, Soil Scientist, and Natural Resource Manager, etc. Students will also be prepared for an advanced degree in a variety of fields, such as Environmental Health, GIS, Natural Resource Management, Environmental Law, and Public Policy.

 PROGRAMME RATIONALE

 

The impacts of human activities as it tries to make ends meet, amidst escalating climate change with all its associated impacts, and striving for a sustainable environment are now a part of everyday life – there is strong demand therefore for expertise in management, rehabilitation, restoration and protection of our environment.  The Bachelor of Environmental Science and Management educate students to contribute to the monitoring and management processes and activities that affect the environment. It provides students with understanding and practical competence in scientific, social, ethical and legal dimensions of the practice of environmental science. The course develops effective technological and communication skills to work collaboratively with employers, colleagues and the community. Graduates are able to apply relevant and current knowledge and the skills they have gained to the practice of their profession with the highest ethical standards. Graduates are effective researchers and decision-makers with skills in critical thinking, problem solving and analysis. The National Development plan will greatly increase the demand for environmental professionals in the coming years.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOME

 

By the end of this programme, students will be able to:

 

  1.          i.            Apply the scope of environmental sciences and the role of being an environmental scientist in society.
  2.        v.            Analyse the environmental impacts of exploitation of hydrocarbon fuels.
  3.      vi.            Analyse the impacts of water and air pollution.
  4.     vii.            Distinguish between good and poor waste management practices.
  1. Carry an independent and rigorous research, but also able to work well in a team.
  2. Be proficient in a range of scientific skills, including field-based observation and data collection, specialised laboratory-based analysis, computing (including spatial analysis), communication, and oral and written presentation.
  3. Be able to recognise the importance and benefits of research-based learning to their academic profile and to evaluate their own performance in a range of learning contexts and under different modes of assessment.
  4. 1.7 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

     

    There is a strong demand for B.Sc. Environmental Science and Management graduates in industry, state agencies, consultancy companies and local authorities. A career in this profession is multidisciplinary in nature with a huge range of options available to graduates in both the public and private sectors. Scientific skills and environmental experience have led graduates to careers such as botanist, zoologist, soil scientist, meteorologist, environmental consultant, hydrologist, forester, policy campaign manager, District environment officers. These environmental professional positions entail, for example, managing waste, implementing environmental management systems, developing new and cleaner technologies, monitoring pollutant levels, environmental impact assessment in relation to new developments and management of health & safety in the work environment. There are also numbers of jobs available in conservation.

Admission to this programme shall be as follows:

 Direct Entry Scheme

  1. Ugandan applicants: Applicants should hold at least (a) Uganda Advanced Certificate of Education (UACE) certificate with at least 2 principal passes (in the essential and relevant science subjects) obtained at the same sitting; and with at least a subsidiary pass in the relevant science or related subjects
  2. International applicants: Applicants must have qualifications that are recognized for University entry in their respective countries for a Bachelor of Environment Sciences and Management degree or equivalent.

Mature Age Entry Scheme

Candidates may be admitted under the above scheme after passing mature age University examinations as agreed by NCHE.

1.5 DURATION OF THE PROGRAMME

 

Bsc. Environmental Science and management is a 3-years programme, after which candidates shall be awarded their degrees on condition that they fulfil the minimum requirements for University graduation. THE MINIMUM GRADUATION LOAD FOR THIS PROGRAMME IS 120 CREDIT UNITS.

 

TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES:

The programme will be taught in accordance with the University’s Teaching and Learning Strategy. The University is committed to developing, maintaining and supporting excellence in teaching and learning, to innovation in teaching practice, and to fostering independent learning and critical thinking in our students, whilst providing appropriate levels of support to students in their learning.

 

The delivery of teaching will take a number of forms:

  1. Lectures
  2. Student presentations
  3. Coursework essays
  4. Research projects
  5. Workshops
  6. Laboratory practical classes
  7. Fieldwork
  8. End of semester examinations

 

DAY $950

EVENING $1000

WEEKEND $1050

0 PROGRAM STRUCTURE

2.1 Year 1

 

CODE COURSE UNITS IN SEMESTER 1 LH PH CH CU
BSE 1101 Mathematics for Environmental Science

60

-

60

4

BSE 1102 Soil Science

45

30

60

4

BSE 1103 Climatology

45

-

45

3

ICT 1101 Computer Applications

30

30

45

3

BSE 1104 Environmental Chemistry

45

30

60

4

BSE 1105 Ecological Principles, Concepts, and Practices

45

30

60

4

COURSEUNITS IN SEMESTER 2
BSE 1201 Environment and Human Population Dynamics

45

-

45

3

BSE 1202 Business Communication Skills

30

30

45

3

BSE 1203 Earth Structures and Geo-processes

45

30

60

4

BSE 1204 Conservation and Sustainable Development

45

-

45

3

BSE 1205 Pollution and its Control

45

30

45

4

BSE 1206 Conflict Resolution in Natural Resources use

60

-

60

4

  YEAR 1 TOTAL CREDIT UNITS

 

 

 

43

 

2.2 Year 2

 

CODE COURSE UNITS IN SEMESTER 1 LH PH CH CU
BSE 2201 Environmental Microbiology

45

30

60

4

BSE 2202 Integrated Water Resources Management

45

30

45

4

BSE 2203 Integrated Waste Management

30

30

45

3

BSE 2204 Urbanization and the Environment

45

30

45

4

BSE 2205 Remote Sensing and GIS

45

30

60

4

BSE 206 Environmental Economics

60

-

60

4

COURSE UNITS IN SEMESTER 2
GMT 2202 Project Planning and Management

45

-

45

3

BSE 2201 Research Methods and Data Management

45

-

45

3

BSE 2202 Environmental Law and Ethics

45

-

45

3

BSE 2203 Carbon Trading

60

-

60

4

BSE 2204 Environmental Informatics

45

30

60

4

GMT 2204 INTERNSHIP (RECESS TERM)

-

30

30

3

  YEAR 2 TOTAL MINIMUM CORE CREDIT UNITS      

43

 

2.3 Year 3

 

CODE COURSE UNITS IN SEMESTER 1 LH TH PH CH CU
BSE 3201 Renewable Energy Technologies

45

-

30

60

4

BSE 3202 EIA and Environmental Auditing

45

-

30

60

4

BSE 3203 Indigenous Technical Knowledge

45

-

-

45

3

BSE 3204 Environmental Health

60

-

-

60

4

HRM 2103 Occupational Safety and Health

45

-

30

60

4

BSE 3205 Basic and Conservation Genetics

45

-

-

45

3

CODE  COURSE UNITS IN SEMESTER 2
GMT 3201 Research Report

30

-

30

45

3

BSE 3202 Plant and Animal Resources

45

-

30

60

4

BSE 3203 Wetlands Ecology and Management

45

-

30

60

4

BSE 3204 Cleaner Production

45

-

-

45

3

BSE 3205 Disaster and Risk Management

45

-

-

45

3

BSE 206 Environmental Biotechnology

45

-

30

60

4

  YEAR 3 TOTAL MINIMUM CORE CREDIT UNITS

 

 

 

 

42

 

 

 

 

 

3.0  FIRST YEAR

3.1 First semester:

 

 

COURSE NAME    :  BSE 1101 MATHEMATICS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

CREDIT UNITS       :    4

 

Brief Course Description:

 

This course introduces the basic concepts of mathematics for the non-specialist student. It provides the student with a foundation for the mathematics necessary for understanding population dynamics and other environmental phenomena.

 

Course Objectives:

 

This course unit strives to develop individuals who are able to deal with environmental issues in a scientific and integrated manner; it will equip students with modern mathematics and its application to real-world problems. It aims to develop a new scientific awareness based on the interaction and integration of the two fields. To that end, mathematics of environmental science course unit has been developed in close association with each other. 

 

Expected Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply basic knowledge in mathematics, and
  2. Apply the knowledge and basic mathematical tools to the analysis of environmental challenges

 

Detailed Course Outline:

TOPIC

CH

1. Algebra:Real Numbers, Fractions, Decimals, percentage and rations, indices, algebraic operations, exponents,  factorization and multiplication of algebraic expressions

6

2. Equations:

  1. Linear equations: Solving linear equations, the equation of a line, simultaneous equations
  2. Quadratic equations: Solving quadratic equations by factorization, completion of squares, and the quadratic formula. Cubic equations. Applications.

6

3. Functions:

  1. Important definitions, Graphs of functions:  linear, quadratic, and cubic functions), Solving simultaneous equations graphically, Solving quadratic equations graphically, Inverse functions
  2. Exponential and Logarithmic functions: Exponential expressions, the exponential function and its graph, logarithms, laws of logarithms, solving equations with logarithms, applications.

10

4. Differentiation and IntegrationDifferentiation:

  1. Definition, a derivative as a rate of change, the derivative as the slope of a curve at a point.
  2. Rules for completing derivatives
  3. Differentiation of composite functions
  4. Second derivative and convexity
  5. Maxima and minima
  6. Integration
  7. Definitions, Areas under a curve
  8. Integration as an anti-derivative
  9. Rules for Integration

20

6. Financial Mathematics: Arithmetic and geometric progressions. Simple and compound interest, effective and nominal rates of interest. Present and future values of cash flows. Net Present Value. Internal Rate of Return. Payback Period.

10

7. Vectors and Matrices: Addition, subtraction and multiplication of matrices. The determinant and inverse of a 2 X 2 matrices. Solving simultaneous equations by matrix method.  Solutions of linear systems of equations by row reduction.

8

Practicals

00

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

60

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Group discussions

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Test -15%
  2. Carry home coursework-15%
  3. End of semester examination-(70%)

 

Reading list:

 

  1. A Continuing Saga. ATEA Journal, 35(2), 18-19.
  2. Briley, W. (2008). Science, Mathematics and Technology or “There and Back Again”
  3. Brinkworth, P., & Truran, J. (1999). Year 12 students’ beliefs about mathematics, mathematicians and users of mathematics. Australian Senior Mathematics Journal, 13(1), 4-14.
  4. C. Truesdell. An Idiot’s Fugitive Essays on ScienceSpringer-Verlag, New York, 1984.
  5. Churach, D., & Rickards, T. (2005). Motivational drivers affecting career choices in the resource sector : the Science Career Inventory (SCI). Paper presented at the International Conference on Science, Mathematics and Technology Education.
  6. E.P. Wigner. The unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics in the natural sciences. In J.H. Weaver, editor, The World of Physics, page 81. Simon and Schuster, New York, 1987.

COURSE NAME     :     BSE 1102 SOIL SCIENCE

CREDIT UNITS       :      4

 

Brief Course Description:

 

Soil Science is a study of soil, its importance, processes of soil formation, soil response to changing environmental conditions. The course unit helps the student to understand what is contained in the soil, and how these components interact to provide goods and services.

 

Course Objectives:

 

This course unit will:

 

  1. Provide students with better appreciation of the distribution and variability of soils and their properties across the landscape,
  2. Equip students with knowledge of how these properties are created and how they effect landscape processes (both at a large and small scale),
  3. Equip students with preliminary ability to investigate soil characteristics and,
  4. Enable students understand how we manage (or not) soils and their properties for a multitude of objectives.

Expected Learning outcomes:

 

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify and characterize elementary aspects of soil formation,
  2. Discuss basic soil physical, chemical, biological, and morphological properties,
  3. Explain behaviour of soils in the managed and natural landscapes,
  4. Discuss the role of soil management for effective environment conservation,
  5. Explain why soil is an important natural resource for sustainable socio-economic development,
  6. Apply the techniques of soil examination in the field and soil plant nutrient analysis in the laboratory.

Detailed Course Outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1. Introduction:

  1. General overview and concept of soils
  2. Soil Pedology/Pedogenesis (soil formation processes and factors – from parent material)
  3. Rock weathering
  4. Soil profile, colour, texture, and structure

4

2. Compositions of soils:Interactions of solid, aqueous and biotic components

4

3. Soil  classification

2

4. Geology and geomorphology:Soil history of Uganda and their influence on soil geography and soil properties in Uganda

4

5. Soil chemistry, properties and characteristics:Chemical soil compositions colloids, ion exchange and organic matter

4

6. Soil physics: Physical characteristics of soil

  1. Soil texture and structure
  2. Particle and bulk density of mineral soils
  3. Soil water capillarity and drainage
  4. Tilth and tillage of soils
  5. Soil aeration, temperature and water movement

4

7. Soil Biology: (Soil Organisms and Ecology)

  1. Soil organisms- kind, numbers, activities (macro, meso and micro) both beneficial and detrimental to plants and man.
  2. Interaction of higher plants and soil organisms (Rhizosphere) – root exudes and their effects on life and micro organism activities. Effect of foreign additive materials (soil amendments, dumping, chemicals, etc.) on activities of land use systems (agriculture, plant nurseries, roads, mulches, tree planting, etc.)

6

8. Biogeochemical CyclesNutrient cycles: water, carbon, nitrogen, sulphur, phosphorus, etc.

4

9. Soil degradation processes and conservation practices in Uganda

  1. Issues in soil degradation
  2. Soil and water conservation and management

4

10. Soil science practical skills

  1. Study of soils in the field- soil site, characteristics, soil profile descriptions and soil sampling.
  2. Laboratory soil chemical tests using Soil Test Kit (pH, NO3-, CEC, etc).

5

11. Current trends in Soil Science research

4

Practical Hours

30

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

60

 

 

Modes of Delivery

  1. Lectures
  2. Practicals
  3. Reading assignments
  4. Group discussions and student presentations
  5. Field trips

 

Modes of Assessment

  1. Tests (10)
  2. coursework, (10)
  3. Student presentations (10%)
  4. End of semester exam (70%)

 

Reading list:

  1.          i.            Paustian, K., Parton, W.J. and Persson, J. (1992). Modelling soil organic matter in organic-amended and nitrogen-fertilized long term plots. Soil Science Society of America Journal, vol 56, no 2, pp 476-488. Soil Science Society of America.
  2.        ii.            Paustian, K., Collins, H.P. and Paul, E.A. (1997). Management controls on soil carbon. In Soil Organic Matter in Temperate Agroecosystems: Long term experiments in North America, chapter 2, pp 15-49. (Eds, Paustian, K., Elliot, E.T., Paul, E.A. and Cole, C.V.). CRC Press.
  3.       iii.            Vitousek, P.M., Turner, D.R., Parton, W.J., and Sanford, R.L. (1994). Litter decomposition on the Mauna Loa environmental matrix, Hawai’i: Patterns, mechanisms and models. Ecology 75 (2), pp 418-429. Ecological society of America.

COURSE NAME       :   BSE 1103 CLIMATOLOGY

CREDIT UNITS          :     3

 

Brief Course Description:

 

The course unit provides an overview of the physical processes responsible for determining global and regional climate. The course objective is to help students understand the weather, its elements, and how the weather affects the environment. Atmosphere and the processes involved to produce worldwide weather and climate, as well as the causes of world climatic change.

 

Course Objectives:

The basic objectives of this course unit are as follows:

  1. Discerning climatology from weather.
  2. Knowing the different areas of study within climatology.
  3. Understanding of the basic physical processes controlling climate.
  4. Recognizing the extent and limitations of the global data gathering network.
  5. Comprehending the nature of climate classification.
  6. Understanding the concept of climate variability and theories for climate change.
  7. Recognizing natures as well as human’s impact on climate and vice versa.
  1.   viii.            Knowing how climatic data can be used to improve life on earth.

 

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this course unit, students should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate human activities that affect climate and its change.
  2. Analyse the effect of climate change on human beings and the environment.
  3. Evaluate possible causes of climate change and its impact on natural systems

 

Detailed Course Outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1.Introduction: Definition and overview of climatology and its relevance in environmental management 2
2. Atmosphere and its structure

  1. Weather, weather elements and their interaction, effect on general climate
  2. Climate sensitivity
6
3. Radiation and Related Concepts

  1. What are electromagnetic waves?
  2. The electromagnetic spectrum
  3. Emission of electromagnetic radiation
  4. Absorption of electromagnetic radiation
  5. Radiation and climate
  6. Solar radiation

8

4. Atmospheric Dynamics

  1. Newton’s second law of motion
  2. Tornadoes
  3. Effects of earth’s rotation
  4. Waves in the atmosphere in middle latitudes
  5. Low-latitude waves and tropical cyclones
  6. Global circulation and pressure patterns

8

5. Surface processes

  1. Surface energy budget
  2. Surface-air heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes
  3. Effect of atmospheric stability and surface roughness
  4. Estimation of vertical fluxes
  5. Role of snow and ice
  6. El Niño and La Niña

8

6. Earth-atmosphere energy balanceGlobal energy balance

5

7. Water balance and the Hydrologic cycle

4

8. Climatic change due to human activities

4

Practicals

00

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

45

 

Modes of Delivery

  1. Lectures
  2. Fieldwork
  3. Group discussions

 

Modes of Assessment

  1. Tests (10)
  2. Coursework (20%)
  3. End of semester exam (70%)

 

Reading list:

 

  1. A Climate modelling primer. McGuffie K. and Henderson-Sellers A. (1997). Published by John Wiley & Sons;
  2. An Introduction to three-dimensional climate modelling. Washington W. and Parkinson C. (1991). Published by University Science Books;
  3. Atmosphere, weather and climate. Barry R., and Chorley R. (1992). Published by Routledge;
  4. Climate and global environmental change. Harvey L. (2000). Published by Prentice Hall;
  5. Climate change 2001: Impacts, adaptation and vulnerability. Edited by McCarthy J. et al. (2001). Published by Cambridge University Press for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change;

 

 

COURSE NAME     : ICT 1101 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS

CREDIT UNITS        :  3

 

Brief Course Description:

 

This course unit helps students in understanding and use of computers to facilitate word processing and data analysis. Its widely used applications include word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation software.

 

Course Objectives:

The objective of basic computing as a course unit is to provide a general understanding and equip students with basic and advanced skills in computer applications that would assist them in undertaking more challenging tasks that require computer knowledge.

Learning outcomes:

 

By the end of this course students should be able to:

  1. Explain the basic concepts of information technology and computing
  2. Use a computer
  3. Demonstrate a basic understanding of computer hardware and software.
  4. Demonstrate computer problem solving skills.
  5. Utilize web technologies.
  6. Present conclusions effectively, orally and in writing.

Detailed Course Outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1. Introduction

  1. Computer and its complements
  2. Use of computers
  3. Types of computers

4

2. Evolution of computing and Information Technology

2

3. Basic Concept of Information Technology

2

4. Using a computer and managing files; Desktop environment and file organization

4

5. Word Processing; practical of document typing, editing and formatting

4

6. Spreadsheets; hands-on using Microsoft Excel

6

7. Presentation; hands-on using PowerPoint

4

8. Introduction to websites and internet

  1. E-learning
  2. Search engines
  3. Downloading

4

Practical Hours

30

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

45

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Practicals

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Tests (15%)
  2. Coursework (150%)
  3. End of semester exam (70%)

 

Reading list:

 

  1. David G. Garson (1999).  Information Technology and Computer Applications.
  2. Edward E.Brent and Ronald E.Anderson (1990). Computer Application
  3. Goin Weil Harper (1998). Computer Applications.
  4. Jim MC Carter, Jacqui Salerno Mabin and G.Davod Garspm (1999). Computer Application and Information Technology.
  5. Susan M.Hakey (1980). A guide to computer application in the Humanities.

 

 

COURSE NAME      :   BSE 1104 ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY

CREDIT UNITS         :   4

 

Brief Course Description:

 

This course unit deals with the natural and human-enhanced chemical processes that take place in the environment impacting environmental quality. The course helps the student to understand the chemical processes in the environment in order to be better environmental stewards and managers.

 

Course Objectives:

The objectives of this course unit are to:

  1. Develop an understanding of chemicals and their effects on the environment.
  2. Learn basic chemical content in context.
  3. Design and carry out field research.
  4. Know how business and government policies toward chemicals in the environment affect the planet.
  1. Apply fundamental chemistry principles to environmental topics like greenhouse gases, acid rain and recycling.

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this course students should be able to:

  1. Explain the linkage between Chemistry and the Environment, including causes and Effects of Environmental problems/pollution arising from the chemical processes
  2. Demonstrate practical and analytical skills in Environmental Chemistry
  3. Formulate solutions to address environmental challenges

 

Detailed Course Outline:

TOPIC

CH

1 Introduction

  1. General concept and scope of Environmental Chemistry; Definitions for some common environmental terms
  2. Nomenclature in Environmental Chemistry; Environmental segments

8

2. Biogeochemical cycles (geological, hydrological, oxygen, nitrogen and sulphur, etc.)

5

3. The chemical reactions in the environment and their implications (acid-base reactions, redox reactions, etc.)

  1. Atmosphere: composition and photochemical reactions in the atmosphere
  2. Hydrosphere
  3. Lithosphere
  4. Biosphere
  5. Science of climate change: air pollution, greenhouse gases, greenhouse effect, global warming

12

4. Chemical toxicologyBiochemical and health effects of heavy metals (As, Cd, Pb, Hg, etc. ), organic and inorganic pollutants/contaminants, etc.

8

5. Chemical warfare and Biowarfare agents

6

6. Applications of environmental chemistry: green chemistry, water treatment, water quality control, air pollution control, etc.

6

Practical Hours

30

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

60

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures;
  2. Practicals;
  3. Group discussions;
  4. Field trips.

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Tests (10)
  2. Coursework (10%)
  3. Students presentation (10)
  4. End of semester examination (70%)

 

Reading list:

  1. Sigel, A.; Sigel, H.; Sigel, R.K.O. (Editors) (2010). Organometallics in Environment and Toxicology. Metal Ions in Life Sciences.
  2. VanLoon, Gary W.; Duffy, Stephen J. (2000). Environmental Chemistry.
  3. Stanley E Manahan. Environmental Chemistry. CRC Press. 2004.
  4. Julian E Andrews, Peter Brimblecombe, Tim Jickells, Peter Liss, Brian Reid. An Introduction to Environmental Chemistry. Blackwell Publishing. 2004.
  5. Rene P Schwarzenbach, Philip M Gschwend, Dieter M Imboden. Environmental Organic Chemistry, Second edition. Wiley-Interscience, Hoboken, New Jersey, 2003.
  6. Harrison, R.M (edited by). Understanding Our Environment, An Introduction to Environmental Chemistry and Pollution, Third Edition. Royal Society of Chemistry. 1999.

 

COURSE NAME         :   BSE 1105 ECOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES, CONCEPTS AND PRACTICES

CREDIT UNITS             :   4

 

Brief Course Description:

This course unit provides students with basic knowledge and understanding of the principles, structure and functions of ecosystems so that the student is able to address degradation to which the ecosystems may be subjected.

 

Course Objectives:

 

  1. To learn about basic ecology
  2. To understand better the interrelationship between living organisms and non living items, cycling of materials, etc.
  3. Students will discuss the application of ecological principles and concepts that pertain to the vegetation of rangeland ecosystems during a 4-day field trip. In addition topics which are currently developing issues in rangeland ecology will be discussed.

 

 

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

  1.          i.            Apply the basic principles of ecology in ecosystem management
  2.        ii.            Appreciate the ways organisms interact directly and indirectly with their physical environment and with each other
  3.       iii.            Identify and describe inter-relationships between biotic and abiotic environment
  4.      iv.            Discuss the major ecosystems and their resilience to disturbance
  5.        v.            Carry out relevant research on current trends in the ecological discipline.

 

Detailed Course Outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1. Ecology – definitions, scope, and importance

4

2. Ecosystems -  types, structures and functions

3

3. Ecological populations and communities

  1.          i.            Species, dynamics, stability and human impacts
  2.        ii.            Interactions and interrelationships, dispersions, predation, herbivory, and competition
  3.       iii.            Dominant and alien species
  4.      iv.            Role of succession in community dynamics
  5.        v.            Carrying capacity

8

4. Energy flow in ecological systems

  1.          i.            Primary and secondary productivities
  2.        ii.            Food chains and food webs
  3.       iii.            Trophic levels, ecological efficiencies and pyramids
  4.      iv.            Limiting factors in ecosystems

8

5. Energy and nutrient cycles (Nitrogen, Phosphorous, Carbon, Water,  Sulphur)

4

  1.          i.            The major ecosystems (aquatic and terrestrial) and their resilience from disturbance
  2.        ii.            Ecosystem goods and services and ecosystem conservation

7

7. Ecologically sustainable development: concepts and applicability

4

8. Biological diversity

4

9. Current trends in ecological research

3

Practicals

30

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

60

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Group discussions
  3. Field trips
  4. Practicals

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Tests (15%)
  2. Coursework (15%)
  3. End of semester exam (70%)

 

Reading List 

  1. Michael Begon, A.H. Fitter, E.D. Ford, A. Macfadyen (1990). Advances in Ecological Research.  Published by Academic Press.
  2. Bety Jean Craige (2002). Ecosystem Ecologist and Environmentalist by published by university of Georgia press 2002.
  3. Odum E.: (2000). Principles of Ecology. University of Georgia(various editions 2 years)
  4. Robert J.and A.Goodland  (1990). Race to save the tropics: Ecology and economics for a sustainable future .
  5. Simon A. Levin (2009). The Princeton guide to ecology. Princeton University Press.

 

 

 

3.2 Second semester:

 

COURSE NAME       : BSE 1201 ENVIRONMENT AND HUMAN POPULATION DYNAMICS

CREDIT UNITS          :  3

 

Brief Course Introduction:

 

This course unit introduces students to the basic concepts of population dynamics in relation to the environment and helps them to understand impact of demographic trends on environmental quality and vice versa. It helps students to apply the demographic trends to international, national and local levels.

 

Course Objectives:

 

The objective s of this course unit is to:

 

  1. Use mathematical methods to determine human population dynamics and trends and summarize data in charts and graphs for the public.
  2. Make students Know that the more forces that are identified that affect human population dynamics, the more difficult it becomes to predict demographic changes.
  3. Understand human population trends, and to appreciate how social, political, economic, and cultural factors can shape events.
  4. Provide information about population, health, and the environment, and empowers students to use the information to advance the well-being of current and future generations.

 

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this course students should be able to:

  1. Explain selected demographic trends and their relationship to the environment
  2. Use selected quantitative methods in the analysis of the effects of human population dynamics on the environment
  3. Apply demographic concepts in the managing the environment

 

Detailed Course Outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1. Introductioni.            The field of population study

ii.            Basic concepts: Mortality; Fertility; Nuptiality and Migration

iii.            Sources of data and analysis

2
2. Population composition and the environmenti.            Physical distribution

ii.            Age-sex composition

iii.            Social and cultural characteristics and practices

iv.            Economic characteristics

4

3. Concepts of mortalityi.            Basic measurements of mortality

ii.            Pattern and trend differentials

iii.            Analysis frameworks – biological vs. social

iv.            Mortality and social and environmental issues; illness and death

v.            Population and aging elderly

8

4. Basic measurements of fertilityi.            Pattern and trend differentials

ii.            Analytical frameworks

iii.            Bongaarts, Davis, Mason

iv.            Family planning and fertility

v.            Determinants of nuptiality

vi.            Age at first marriage and choice of marital partner

8

4. Migration and the environmenti.            Basic measurements

ii.            Typology, adaptation of migrants

iii.            Problems and consequences

 

 

6

5. Population growth and the environmenti.            World population growth and projections

ii.            Zero population growth and optional projections

4

6. Classical and contemporary population theoriesi.            Malthusian vs. Marxian theories

ii.            The demographic theory

iii.            The Cybernetics theories and system theories

iv.            Population theory – types of population policies, formulation of population policies

v.            Current trends

13

Practicals

00

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

45

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Group discussions and presentations
  3. Field trips

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Tests (10%)
  2. Coursework (10%)
  3. Presentation (10%)
  4. End of semester exam (70%)

 

 

 

 

Reading list:

 

  1. Cline, W.R. 2007. Global Warming and Agriculture: Impact Estimates by Country. Washington, DC: Center for Global Development and the Peterson Institute for International Economics.
  2. According to the United Nations Population Division’s medium variant population projection.
  3. Office of the Prime Minister. 1993. National Population Policy of Ethiopia. Available at: http://cyber.law. harvard.edu/population/policies/ETHIOPIA.htm.
  4. Barnett, T.P., J.C. Adam, and D.P. Lettenmaier. 2005. “Potential impacts of a warming climate on water availability in snowdominated regions.” Nature 438:303-309.
  5. Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, edited by S. Solomon, D. Qin, M. Manning,

 

 

COURSE NAME      : BSE 1202 ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION COMMUNICATION SKILLS

CREDIT UNITS         :  3

 

Brief Course Description:

This course unit builds theoretical and practical knowledge and skills in environmental education and communication. It focuses on developing the competency and skills of students in effectively presenting environmental information to audiences.

 

Course Objectives:

 

The Course unit aims to enable participants to:

  1. Gain information and knowledge about basic ecological concepts and major global/ regional
  2. environmental concerns;
  3. Understand the philosophy and rationale behind environmental education and the role of education in sustainable development activities;
  4. Acquire knowledge and skills in conceptualizing, planning, implementing and evaluating environmental education proposals and projects for various target groups;
  5. Enhance skills for producing, selecting and using appropriate and cost-effective environmental education resource materials for various target groups;
  6. Gain an exposure to the concept, principles and implications of project management and capacity building in their work.

 

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this course, the students should be able to:

  1.          i.            Describe the importance of education and communication in explaining current environmental issues
  2.        ii.            Explain how environmental information is transmitted
  3.       iii.            Interpret, package and disseminate environmental messages
  4.      iv.            Describe the various ways of promoting environmental information and the techniques of communicating environmental information
  5.        v.            Identify and explain the barriers to communicating on the environment and how these barriers can be overcome

 

 

 

 

 

Detailed Course Outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1. Introduction

  1. Definition: environmental education, communication skills
  2. Concepts and ideas of environmental education
  3. Definition of concepts namely: environment and education

4

2. Theories and perspectives of communication on the environment

2

3. Principles of Environment Education

  1. Importance of Environmental Education
  2. Need for environmental education in schools
  3. Need for environmental education in communities
  4. Goals, principles and objectives of environmental education

4

4. Types/Forms of environmental education

  1. Formal environmental education
  2. Non formal environmental education
  3. Informal environmental education

2

5. Presentations  and verbal communications

  1. Audience analysis
  2. Methods of presentations (public presentations, speeches, meetings, interviews))
  3. Organization of presentations
  4. Delivery of presentations
  5. Non verbal communication
  6. Negotiation skills

4

6. Environment Information packaging: Risk Communication, Crisis Communication, etc.

2

7. Approaches for information dissemination:Directive and Participatory approaches in disseminating environmental information

4

8. Barriers to environmental education and communication

  1. Institutional challenges
  2. Culture, etc.

2

9. Reports and proposals

6

Practicals

30

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

45

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Group discussion  and presentations
  3. Practical/field trips

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Tests (10%)
  2. Coursework (10)
  3. Student presentations (10%)
  4. End of semester exam (70%)

 

Reading list:

 

  1. Allen, William. 2001. A news media perspective on environmental communication. Bioscience, Vol. 51, 1ssue 4, p289, 3p.
  2. Benedict, Faye. 1999. A Systemic approach to sustainable environmental education. Cambridge Journal of Education, Vol. 29, Issue 3.
  3. Castillo, Alicia, García-Ruvalcaba, Salvador and Martinez R., Luis M. 2002. Environmental education as facilitator of the use of ecological information: a case study in Mexico.
  4. Chaineux, Marie-Claire P.S.G., Charlier, Roger H. 1999. Strategies in environmental education. International Journal of Environmental Studies
  5. Detjen, Jim. 1995. The media’s role in science education. Bioscience, Vol. 45, Issue 6.

 

 

COURSE NAME     :  BSE 1203 EARTH STRUCTURES AND GEO-PROCESSES

CREDIT UNITS        :  4

 

Brief Course Description:

 

The course unit focuses on the analysis of the physical and chemical processes within the earth’s systems and interactions among the ecospheres and their impact on the human habitat. It helps the student to observe, explore and model the relevant geo-processes to assess the state of the geosystem and recognise changes and trends.

 

Course objectives:

 

The objective of this course unit is to introduce at an intermediate level the fundamentals of structural analysis, including:

  1. Construction and interpretation of geologic maps;
  2. Descriptive, kinematic and dynamic analysis of structures;
  3. The mechanics of brittle and ductile deformation of rocks;
  4. Identification and interpretation of geologic structures in the field.
  5. Overall, the course unit is expected to contribute to inferring deformation processes from observed geologic structures. This bears not only on un-raveling geodynamic processes which have shaped the Earth’s crust but also on understanding the formation of natural resource deposits.

 

Learning outcomes:

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

  1.          i.            Describe the internal structure of the earth
  2.        ii.            Explain the impact of climate on geomorphic processes
  3.       iii.            Critically examine earth structure and geo-processes
  4.      iv.            Apply the principles and mechanisms of earth structure and geo-processes

 

Detailed Course Outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1.Introduction

  1. Definitions (earth structure, geo-processes)
  2. Overview: the history of earth formation

2

2. The internal structure of the earth

  1. Some fundamental concepts
  2.  Internal structure and resources
  3.  External structure and resources
  4.  Evolution of ideas on geomorphic processes
16
3. Geomorphic agents and processesAgents:

  1. Running water; Ground water; Waves, currents, tides, tsunamis; Glaciers; Wind; Living organisms (e.g. man, bacteria)
  2. Processes:
  3. Epigone or exogamic processes: Degradation, Weathering (physical and chemical) and soil formation, Soil processes, Mass wasting; Erosion
  4. Hypogene or endogenetic processes: Diastrophism associated landform; Volcanism (mountain, lakes, rivers, etc.)

16

4. Extraterrestrial processes

  1. In-fall of meteorites
  2. Solar radiation

6

5. Climate influences upon geomorphic processes

5

Practicals

30

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

60

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Discussions and Tutorials
  3. Field trips
  4. Seminars/Workshops

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Tests (10%)
  2. coursework, (20)
  3. End of semester exam (70%)

 

Reading list

  1.          i.            Beb, A. Vander Pluijm, Stephen Marshk (2004). Earth Structure.
  2.       iii.            Geological abstracts by Geo Abstracts Bibliography, Published by Elsevier/Geo Abstracts,1990.
  3.      iv.            Regimald Aldworth Daily (1940) Strength and structure of the earth.
  4.        v.            Richard, J  Hugget (2007), Fundamentals of Geomorphology .
  1. Chemical abstracts (1997) by American chemical society, American chemical society chemical abstracts services published by American chemical society.

 

 

COURSE NAME       :  BSE 1204 CONSERVATION AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

CREDIT UNITS          :   3

 

Brief Course Description:

 

This course unit introduces students to the importance of conservation and an understanding of the strong relationship between development, environment and conservation hence promotion of sustainable development. It promotes change of the attitude and mentality that conservation and development cannot work hand in hand.

 

Course objectives:

 

The key objectives of this course unit to:

  1.          i.            Develop a broad and interdisciplinary understanding of earth’s natural systems and the ways in which humans interact with those systems, at both global and bioregional scales.
  2.        ii.            Acquire a depth of understanding of one of two major knowledge areas of environmental resources – sustainability or conservation – in their theoretical and applied dimensions.
  3.       iii.            Learn specific techniques and practices needed to effectively investigate environmental resources issues and contribute to solutions.
  4.      iv.            Learn to work effectively with others, including those from other fields of knowledge, to creatively address complex real-world environmental problems in a collaborative fashion.
  5.        v.            Develop the ability to communicate effectively both to peers within the field of natural resources and to audiences outside the field.

Expected Learning outcomes:

 

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Identify and analyze the link between environment, conservation and development
  2. Explain and discuss concepts of sustainable development
  3. Develop and promote development projects and programs that are sustainable

 

Detailed Course Outline:

TOPIC

CH

1.Introduction to conservation and sustainable developmenti.            Definition of conservation and sustainable development

ii.            Evolution of conservation and sustainable development; international framework on the environment

4

2. Human-environment interaction:Types and nature of human impacts

4

3. Sustainable developmenti.            Principles and elements of sustainability

ii.            Renewable and non-renewable resources

iii.            Resilience

iv.            Irreversibility

v.            Challenges to attaining sustainable development (environmental, social, economic and political factors)

20

4. Strategies to achieving sustainable developmenti.            Natural resources conservation

ii.            Political, economic, and social strategies

iii.            Participatory management of natural resources

iv.            Millennium development goals

17

Practicals

00

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

45

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Group discussions and presentations
  3. Field trips

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Tests (10%)
  2. Coursework (10%)
  3. Field report writing (10%)
  4. End of semester exam (70%)

 

Reading list:

  1. Buck, L.E., and J.P. Lassoie. 1992. Critical issues in conservation and sustainable development: Design and evaluation of a pilot course. Natural Resources Research and Extensions Series 38. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY.
  2. Campbell, C.A. 1995 Landcare: Participative Australian approaches to inquiry and learning for sustainability. J. Soil Water Conserv. 50:125.131.
  3. Dinerstein, E. 1995. A conservation assessment of the terrestrial ecoregions of Latin America and the Caribbean. World Bank and World Wildlife Fund, Washington, DC.
  4. Getz,W.M, L. Fortmann, D. Cumming, J. du Toit, J. Hilty, R. Martin, M. Murphree, N. Owen-Smith, A.M. Starfield, and M.I. Westphal. 1999. Sustaining natural and human capital:Villagers and scientists. Science (Washington,DC) 283:1855.1856.

 

 

COURSE NAME   :  BSE 1205 POLLUTION AND ITS CONTROL

CREDIT UNITS      :   4

 

Brief Course Description:

 

This course unit addresses the undesirable changes in physical, chemical and biological characteristics of air, land and water induced by human activities. It will empower students with knowledge and skills for setting up and designing better environmental policies and standards for pollution control.

 

Course Objectives:

 

The course will help you realize the following-

  1.          i.            High degree of knowledge base in different of pollution as prevalent around the world
  2.        ii.            Case studies and practical inputs from across the globe on pollution control mechanisms
  3.       iii.            Special emphasis on nuclear pollution control
  4.      iv.            Overview on global pollution issues as well as that of India
  5.        v.            Project work based on topics related to the subject of pollution and its control

 

Learning Outcomes:

 

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Define and explain pollution aspects that can hinder sustainable development
  2. Sensitize local communities/societies  on pollution management and control options in the development options
  3. Demonstrate knowledge, skills and attitudinal abilities in managing pollution and formulating policies and environmental standards for pollution control

 

 

 

 

Detailed Course Outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1.Introductioni.            The concept of pollution

ii.            Point source and non-point source pollution

iii.            Causes and types of pollution (Agricultural waste pollution, Industrial waste, pollution, Food processing industries, Municipal waste pollution, Landfills and waste disposal sites, Aesthetic pollution)

8
2. Terrestrial pollution

  1. Concept of terrestrial pollution
  2. Sources and types terrestrial pollution
  3. Human causes terrestrial pollution
  4. Ways of controlling terrestrial pollution

6

3. Atmospheric pollution and controli.            Concept of atmospheric pollution

ii.            Sources of atmospheric pollution: accidental spills, chemical spray, intermittent dumping of wastes/pollutants in open spaces, combustion of fossil fuels and organic matter and automobiles exhaust

iii.            Climate and human activities  (Atmospheric pollution and effects on climate change, The concept of climate change and anthropogenically induced global warming, Roles of humans in atmospheric pollution)

8

4. Aquatic pollution

  1. Forms and causes of water pollution
  2. Direct and indirect effects of water pollution
  3. Ways of controlling or reducing water pollution

6

5.Environmental standards for pollution control

  1. Definitions of standards of pollution control
  2. Pollution abatement principles
  3. Cleaner production technologies and pollution control
  4. General control measures of environmental pollution

8

6.Impacts of man’s activities on resources and environmental pollution and management

  1. Industrialization, deforestation, urbanization as related to ozone depletion and pollution levels
  2. Pollution control by taxation (Pigouvian taxes) and optimum pollution standards
  3. Environmental impact assessment (EIA) standards of pollution potential projects

9

7. Practicals (Laboratory and field measurements on pollutionIndustrial pollution control technologies).

30

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

60

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Field trips
  3. Practicals

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Tests (10%)
  2. Coursework (10%)
  3. Student’s presentations (10%)
  4. End of semester exam (70%)

 

Reading list:

 

  1. Jamison, D.T. (Eds). (2006). Disease Control Priorities in Developing Countries 2nd Ed.. Disease Control Priorities Project.  Oxford University Press & World Bank
  2. Cahill, Lawrence B, ed (1987).  Environmental Audits, 5th ed. Government Institutes., Rockville.
  3. NEMA (1998). Environmental Standards and Preliminary Environmental Impact
  4. Assessment for Water Quality and Discharge of Effluent into Water and Land in  Uganda.  NEMA, Kampala
  5. UNEP (1996).  Monitoring Industrial Emissions and Wastes (UNEP Technical Report: No.27).  UNEP, Paris.

 

 

COURSE NAME : BSE 1206 CONFLICT RESOLUTION IN NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

CREDIT UNITS   :   4

 

Course Description:

 

Conflict is a natural and common phenomenon in social interaction. Many models of social work practice – radical, ecological, systems, generalist, and problem-solving approaches – engender concepts such as conflict, advocacy, negotiation, and mediation. While different types of conflict management are discussed as important social work roles, there are few opportunities in the social work curriculum for students to explore the theoretical basis for a conflict resolution approach or to gain experience in how to put a comprehensive set of conflict resolution techniques into practice. This course unit will identify a range of conflict resolution approaches, but will focus primarily on negotiation, mediation, and advocacy.

 

Course Objectives:

 

Students are expected to perform work at a high level, including the ability to perform critical analysis, comprehend theory and its relevant application, and to effectively communicate orally and written. This course unit will be taught similar to a seminar thereby relying more on student involvement in leading discussions.

 

Expected learning outcome:

 

On successful completion of this course unit, students will be able to:

  1. Identify a range of conflict resolution methods, approaches, strategies, and skills for work with individuals, families, organizations, communities, and social policy.
  2. Appreciate the principles of negotiation, mediation, and advocacy in order to promote health and social wellbeing for clients, as well as broader social change.
  3. Critically analyze the use of CR approaches, strategies, and skills – linking theory, research, values, skills, and self-reflection.
  4. Actively participate in reasoned discourse of natural resource policy issues from multiple viewpoints and by possessing a working knowledge of the role of scientific, economic, political, and ethical factors in natural resource policy formulation.
  5. Apply the rational policy process model to identify and define natural resource policy problems and to formulate realistic, worthwhile, and politically viable policy solutions.

 

 

 

 

Detail course outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1. Introduction to Decision-making Theory and Social Conflict Theory

2

2. The Roles of Conflict Resolution in Social Practice:The range of conflict resolution approaches: advocacy, negotiation, mediation, third party decision makers, investigation, state enforcement, and social control.

4

3.   Negotiation, Mediation, and Advocacy between Groups

  1. Social Policy: Effecting positive change
  2. Coalitions
  3. Conflict in a Multicultural/Pluralistic Society
  4. Identity-based Conflict

12

4.   Negotiation, Mediation, and Advocacy between Individuals

  1. Students
  2. Co-Workers in an Agency
  3. Family Members
  4. Community Disputes

10

5.   Negotiation, Mediation, and Advocacy between Individuals/Families and Social Systems

  1. Child and Family
  2. Health and Aging
  3. Education
  4. Criminal Justice

12

6.   Limits of Negotiation, Mediation, and Advocacy

  1. Values and Ethical Issues: safety, fairness, responsibility
  2. Power Imbalances
  3. When different types of approaches may be preferable

8

7.   Approaches, Skills, and Strategies in Practice

  1. Power-based, Rights-based, Interest-based, Identity-based, Feminist-informed, Therapeutic, and Transformative Models
  2. Language and Techniques of Conflict Resolution
  3. Styles of dealing with Conflict
  4. Stages of various models of Conflict Resolution
  5. Pre-empting and Reframing
  6. Developing an Environment conducive to Conflict Management

12

Practicals

00

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

60

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Field trips

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Tests (10)
  2. Coursework (20%)
  3. End of semester exam (70%)

 

Reading list:

 

  1. Fisher, R., Ury, W, & Patton, B. (1997). Getting to yes: Negotiating agreement without giving in. New York: Houghton Mifflin. ISBN 9780395631249
  2. Folberg, J., Milne, A., & Salem, P. (2004) (Eds.). Divorce and family mediation: Models, techniques, and applications. New York: Guilford. ISBN 9781593850029 08
  3. Lederach, J. P. (2005). The moral imagination. New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0195174542
  4. Augoustinos, M., & Reynolds, K. J. (2002). Understanding prejudice, racism, and social conflict. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  5. Aureli, F., & deWaal, F. B. M. (2000). Natural conflict resolution. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press. (HM 1136 N37 – Includes CR among animals, as well as a among various cultural groups)

 

4.0 SECOND YEAR

4.1 First Semester:

 

COURSE NAME      :  BSE 2101 ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY

CREDIT UNITS         :   4

 

Brief Course Description:

 

This course unit is concerned with the structure, function, growth and classification of microscopic organisms and with ways of controlling and using their activities in environmental management.

 

Course Objectives:

 

The goal of this course unit is to impart to students knowledge about environmental microbiology and microbial ecology through the study of microbial interactions with other microbial populations, plants and animals, biogeochemical cycling, applied microbiology, and through the use of molecular techniques.

 

Learning Outcomes:

 

By the end of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Identify the various types of microorganisms
  2. Recognize the vital role of microbial communities in the development of new and innovative strategies and products for the management and protection of the environment
  3. Examine the dynamic interactions between microbial communities and the environment and implications of this link in the world today
  4. Use the structural information to determine which components of the cell would be an optimal site of antibiotic use and explain why these sites are optimal in terms of selective toxicity

 

Detailed Course Outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1.Introduction

  1. Microorganisms, microbiology and the environment
  2. Microbial morphology and classification

4

2. History of microbiology

1

3. Plant-microbe interactions

2

4. Microbe-animal interactions

2

3. Review of relevant basic concepts of molecular and cell biology (cell culture and growth kinetics)

4

4. Microbes and Biogeochemical cycles

8

5. Microbial diversity, functions, communities and their adaptive responses

4

6. Applied microbiology, biotechnology and bioremediation

4

7. Industrial microbiology/Biocatalysts

4

8. Microbial communities as indicators of environmental health/microbial toxicology

4

9. Role of microbes as a tool for environmental sustainability

4

10. Biodegradation/bioremediation

4

Practicals

30

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

60

 

Modes of Delivery

  1. Lectures
  2. Field trips
  3. Group discussions
  4. Laboratory lesions

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Coursework   (20%)
  2. Test (10%)
  3. End of semester exam (70%)

 

Reading List

  1.          i.   Patrick Uden (2004). A Guide to Health Drinking water
  2.        ii.   Jared, R. Lead Better (2005). Environmental microbiology published by Elsevier Academic press 2005.
  3.       iii.   P.D. Charma Environmental Microbiology (2005). Published by Alpha Science International.
  4.      iv.   Society for applied Microbiology and Environmental microbiology (2008). Journal Competition Blackwell publishers Ltd.
  5.        v.   Alicia L. Ragout de Spencer (2004). Environmental microbiology methods and protocols Published by Humana Press

 

Course Name      :  BSE 2102 INTEGRATED WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

Credit Units         :   3

 

Brief Course Description:

 

The course unit covers the water cycle (hydrologic cycle), rivers and lakes, groundwater supply, rainwater harvesting, and wetlands. Water quality and its assessment, water use, and wastewater disposal will be studied. The concepts, principles, and tools for Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) are introduced. This knowledge is important in the areas of regulation, remediation, and environmental protection.

 

Course Objectives:

 

  1.          i.            To improve the knowledge of the professionals in IWRM and the current practices of water resources management in the World
  2.        ii.            To facilitate the trainees to develop own action plans that they can use as change projects in home organizations
  3.       iii.            To share experiences from around the world on IWRM through case study analysis and participants learning & sharing

 

Learning Outcomes:

 

By the end of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Describe the concept of the water cycle (hydrologic cycle) and how water moves from one compartment to another
  2. Assess water demand, water use, and the causes of water stress
  3. Analyse basic water quality parameters in the laboratory and field and what the results of water quality analyses mean
  4. Explain the basic principles and practice of IWRM

 

Detailed Course Outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1.Introduction

  1. The concept of Integrated Water Resources Management
  2. The hydrosphere and hydrological cycle and its compartments
     4
2. Water sources (Groundwater; Surface water; Precipitation)

  1. Hydrological measurements and catchment water balance
  2. Climatic and meteorological factors

4

3. Pollution of the aquatic environment (Types and sources of pollution; Point and non-point sources); The mass balance concept

6

4. Water quality and its assessment (Physical, chemical and microbiological water quality parameters; Water source monitoring and sampling; Field and laboratory water quality analyses); Water quality measurements

6

5. Guidelines and standards for water quality (Water and health; Drinking water quality guidelines; Effluent discharge guidelines; Stream quality guidelines)

6

6. Water treatment (Reasons/objectives for water treatment; Types of water treatment processes)

4

7. Water demand, water use, and the causes of water stress; Erosion and deforestation/reforestation

6

8. Effects of water pollution (Changes in water quality; Eutrophication; Algal blooms)

3

9. Water pollution control and water quality management; Integrated Water Resources Management principles and practice; Uganda National Water Quality Management Strategy

6

Practicals

30

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

60

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Practicals
  3. Case studies, exercises
  4. Field trips

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Tests (10%)
  2. Coursework (20%)
  3. End of semester exam (70%)

 

 

Reading list:

 

  1. Calder (2005).  Blue Revolution: Integrated land and water Resource management Published by Earth scan.
  2. Carlo Givpponi, Anthony J. Jakenon, (2006), Sustainable Management of water Resources An Integrated approach. Published by Edward Elgar Publishing.
  3. Gonca Caskun H.,  Kerem  H.  Cigizoglu,  M.Derya Maktar and  Springer (2007) Integration of information for Environmental security
  4. Peter P.Mollinga, Ajaya Dixit, Kusum Attukorala and Saga Publications (2006).  Integrated water Resources management (2006) Global Theory, Emerging Practice, and local needs
  5. Rodalfo Soncini Sesa, and Elsevier, (2007). Integrated and participatory water resources management Theory

 

COURSE NAME     :   BSE 2103 INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT

CREDIT UNITS        :   3

 

Brief Course Description:

 

This course unit focuses on a system of waste collection and disposal that includes separating materials according to type and finding the best use for discarded products which include depositing in a landfill, and recycling some materials through an approved programme and reusing some of these materials. The course unit exposes the student to the monitoring and managing of waste materials.

 

Course Objectives:

 

The primary objective of integrated waste management (IWM) as a course unit is to equip students with knowledge of integrating and optimising waste management, in order to maximise efficiency and minimise the associated environmental impacts and financial costs, and to improve the quality of life of all Ugandans.

Learning Outcomes:

 

By the end of this course unit, the student should be able to:

  1. Recognize wastes types and sources
  2. Draw up and manage a waste program in a community
  3. Make well informed decisions in relation to waste management of an area
  4. Be familiar with the options for waste management
  5. Identify pollution control solutions (e.g. refuse, recycling, source reduction, etc.)
  6. Be competent in planning and implementing an internal waste minimisation programme.

Detailed Course Outline:

TOPIC

CH

1.Introduction

  1. Overview of wastes and the concept of Integrated Waste Management
  2. Waste types and sources
1
2. Excreta disposal, treatment, and reuse

  1. Excreta disposal in developing countries (The ‘haves’ and ‘have nots’; Marketing of low cost sanitation; Urban sanitation)
  2. Types of excreta disposal systems (Pit latrines; Pour flush toilets; Vault toilets and cartage; Septic tanks; Small bore sewers; Personal hygiene; Night soil and sludge reuse; Ecological sanitation; Water availability)

 

 

4
3. Solid waste

  1. Characteristics
  2. Collection, storage, treatment and ultimate disposal
  3. Hazards of solid waste mismanagement
4
4. Planning a sanitation program (Program context and content; Choice of system; Social factors; Costs of operation and maintenance; Incremental sanitation)

1

5.Hazardous waste management

  1. Characteristics
  2. Collection, storage, treatment and ultimate disposal (Industrial wastes; Radioactive waste; Hospital and Infectious wastes; Toxic wastes)
4
6.Liquid wastes:

  1. Wastewater and its treatment (Introduction, waste characteristics; Wastewater treatment objectives; Wastewater treatment methods; Application of treatment methods; Treatment process flow diagrams; Implementation of wastewater management programs; Major elements of wastewater management systems and associated tasks)
  2. Effluent Disposal (Water quality parameters and criteria; Fate process; Disposal on land; Disposal into lakes and rivers; Effluent reuse)
6
7. Surface water drainage (Introduction; Town planning implications; Technical aspects and institutional aspects)

3

8. Health aspects of waste reuse (Introduction; Health and agricultural reuse of wastes; Health and fish farming)

3

9. Community management (Introduction; Reasons for promoting community management; The different roles of participants in community waste management programs; Conditions for community management success)

3

10. Current developments in waste management research

1

Practical Hours

30

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

45

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Group discussions
  3. Field trips
  4. Practicals

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Coursework (30%)
  2. End of semester exam (70%)

 

Reading List:

  1.       i.            Juhasz A.L, G. Magesan  Waste Management ,   Science Publishers,2004
  2.     ii.        William C. Blackman (2001)  CRC Press,  Basic Hazardous waste management
  3.    iii.            Michael L. Garvin (1995) CRC Press, Infectious waste management.
  4.   iv.            Da Zhu(2008). Improving municipal solid waste management in India: a source book for policymakers and practioners.  World Bank Publications

 

 

 

COURSE NAME        :  BSE 2104 URBANIZATION AND THE ENVIRONMENT

CREDIT UNITS           :   3

 

Brief Course Description:

 

The course unit explores the urban planning regimes and their applicability to urban environmental management besides analyzing the context of providing various infrastructure and services in a limited and competitive space. It enables the student to conceptualize the distinctions between urban and rural environments and understand the effects of the urbanization process on the environment and its resources.

 

Objectives:

 

The main objective of this course unit is to provide students with good understanding of the urbanisation problems for better management of the urban environment. Other objective includes the following:

  1. Define and explain  to students the concepts of urbanisation and urbanism;
  2. Guide students on historical origin of urban life;
  3. To help student be able to distinguish between rural and urban functions;
  1.      iv.            To describe the spatio-temporal changes in urban functions;
  2.        v.            Discuss the development of squatter settlements in urban areas;

 

Learning Outcomes:

 

By the end of the course, students should be able to:

  1.          i.            Describe the dynamics of the urbanization process and the environment
  2.        ii.            Discuss the relationship between the urbanization process and the environments
  3.       iii.            Describe the theoretical and practical paradigms in the urban environmental planning and management alternatives
  1. Conceptualise various relevant dimensions of urban and rural environments (give distinctions); and will be in position to carry out urban assessment projects and planning.
  2. Identify the existing gaps between rural settlements and urban settlements, and suggest how such gaps can be reduced

 

Detailed Course Outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1. IntroductionDefinition of terms and an overview of the urbanization process

2

  1. 2. Fundamentals of urbanization
  2. Rural and Urban settlements compared
  3. Reasons for rural-urban migrations (push and pull factors)
  4. Characteristics of urban and rural communities
  5. Dynamics of the urbanization process: global, regional, and country trends and stages (implications for environmental management)
  6. Aspects of rural-urban migration and natural increase and their impacts on the urbanization dynamics
  7. Urban-rural interlinkages; urban footprint and sustainability
  8. Factors for the urbanization differences in various places

8

3. Urban planning

  1. Definitions: planning and urban planning; objectives of urban planning and steps involved in urban planning processes
  2. Major challenges
  3. Approaches
  4. Process of urban planning
  5. Urban and physical planning and its role in environmental management
  6. Urban land-use and land tenure systems and their implications for planning

6

4. Characteristics of urban areas

  1. Urban infrastructure: road network, medical facilities, educational facilities, public transport systems and security; public/open spaces, community facilities and utilities
  2. Urban agriculture: forms of urban agriculture (animal rearing, horticulture, etc), effects of urban agriculture
  3. Structural adjustment programmes and urban planning
  4. Problems experienced by urban authorities in providing services

6

5.Sustainable Urban Environment Management

  1. The concept of sustainability and sustainable cities (greening concept)
  2. Indicators of monitoring sustainable urban development and lack of sustainability for an urban environment
  3. Urban housing and the challenge of slums, informal settlements, shanty towns, and implications for development

5

6.Urban environmental concerns

  1. Urban Water and Sanitation:
  2. Water quality and supply in urban areas: urban water management cycle
  3. Urban water related infections/sources of water in urban areas; water-infection path ways
  4. Urban water treatment process (case study: Kampala water-Ggaba 2 water plant, Sewage NWSC- Bugolobi, Kampala)
  5. Causes of poor water quality in urban areas (developed and developing countries)
  6. Urban pollution:

a)       Introduction: major forms of urban pollution

b)       Air pollution: causes of air pollution, effects of urban air pollution and how to overcome these effects

c)       Urban water pollution and control

d)       Sanitation, human waste, toxic waste, pollution and management strategies

e)       Noise pollution: introduction and measuring noise pollution, effects of noise pollution; mitigating urban noise pollution problems

f)        Light pollution and other aesthetic pollution

g)       Soil/land pollution: causes of urban land pollution, effects and preventive actions of urban land pollution

12

7. Public and private sector participation in urban environmental management: the role of communities, community based organizations (CBOs), non-governmental organizations (NGOs), government, and civil society

6

Practicals

30

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

60

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Practical assignments and
  3. study tours in selected urban sites/settlement

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Tests (10%)
  2. Coursework (10%)
  3. Field report (10%)
  4. End of semester exam (70%)

 

Reading list:

  1. Andre Sorensen (2004).  The making of Urban Japan:  Cities anf Planning from the edo to the twenty first century. Published by Routledge.
  2. John Ratchiffe, Micheal stubbbs, Miles Keeping, (2009). Urban Planning & real Estate development: Published by Taylor & Francis
  3. Kiessling K. Linal and Hans Landberge (eds) (1994).  Population, Economic Development and the environment. Oxford University Press.
  4. Peter Geoffey Hall (2002). Urban and Regional Planning

 

 

COURSE NAME   :  BSE 2105 REMOTE SENSING AND GIS

CREDIT UNITS      :   4

 

Brief Course Description:

 

The course unit covers aspects of Remote Sensing (RS) and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) and how they are used in spatial data acquisition and management for environmental management. Students are provided with knowledge in basic data and information acquisition from sensors above the earth’s surface.

 

Course Objectives

  1. To understand the principles, applications, trends, and pertinent issues of geographical information systems and sciences, including remote sensing (RS), Photogrammetry, cartography, and global positioning systems (GPS).
  2. To provide learning and teaching experiences with real world problems.
  3. To develop technical skills and competence in data and information acquisition, extraction, management and analysis; spatial and statistical modelling; mapping and visualization.
  4. To increase awareness of GIS and modelling tools for improving competition and business potential.
  5. To describe how geographical information is used, managed, and marketed globally.

Learning Outcomes:

 

By the end of the course students should be able to:

  1.          i.            Demonstrate understanding of the concepts of Remote Sensing and GIS
  2.        ii.            Translate the process of remote Sensing into real environmental management applications
  3.       iii.            Exhibit knowledge and skills on the characteristics and representation of some of the different data types (models) sources and products required for both GIS and Remote Sensing applications for environmental management
  4.      iv.            Translate theoretical knowledge of GIS concepts to application in environmental management
  5.        v.            Exhibit ability to integrate difference geographical information datasets

 

 

 

Detailed Course Outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1. The concepts of Remote Sensing (RS) and Geographical Information Systems (GIS)

1

2. Remote Sensing Instruments

  1. Definition, different categories of sensors and their importance
  2. Sensor Resolution (spatial, temporal and spectral)
  3. Description of various types of sensors
  4. Principles of Radar
  5. Platforms and Sensors: types, uses and functions

6

3. Remote Sensing

  1. Aerial photography: acquisition of aerial photographs, aerial photo interpretation, photo mosaics, geometric correction of photographs, base map production
  2. Satellite imagery: acquisition of satellite images, image interpretation and processing, image enhancement, image classification, data integration and analysis
  3. Radar

10

4. How RS and GIS complement each other

2

5.Geographical Information Systems

  1. Transformation of analog to digital data, data management systems (ArcView, etc.)
  2. Concepts of GIS: Spatial operations, Components of a GIS, Geographic data and coordinate systems, Spatial and attribute data

6

6.Data sources

  1. Vector and raster data
  2. Data from Remote Sensing images

4

7.GIS data analysis

  1. Retrieval and overlays
  2. Neighbouring operations

4

8.Practical Application of GIS and RS

  1. Remote Sensing practical
  2. Comparing different sensor data characteristics
  3. Image processing
  4. Image interpretation
  5. GIS practical sessions
  6. Data integration and analysis
  7. Mini projects and case studies
  8. Use of remotely sensed data in monitoring land use/cover
  9. Land use, vegetation cover mapping
  10. Estimation of vegetation cover (greenness) using vegetation indices
  11. General applications of Remote Sensing

12

Practicals

30

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

60

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Group discussions
  3. Field trips
  4. Practicals

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Tests (10%)
  2. Coursework (20%)
  3. End of semester exam (70%)

 

Reading List

  1. Christopher Legg (1992), Remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems, Published by Ellis harwood.
  2. James J. Sinpson, University of California 91992) Remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems Published by University of California.
  3. Victor Meser, John Wiley  and sons  (2008)  Integration  of Gis and Remote Sensing
  4. Chandra, A.M., Ghosh S. K., Alpha Science, 2006. Remote Sensing and Geographical Information System
  5. Yan A. Twilmasi and Edwin Mellen Press, (2005), Park Management in Ghana using Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing Technology

 

 

COURSE NAME   :   BSE 2106 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS

CREDIT UNITS      :    4

 

Brief Course Description:

This course unit introduces economic principles used in the management of environmental resources. It enables students to identify the proper role of economics in the policy making process, and to assess competing approaches to the analysis of environmental concerns.

 

Course Objectives

  1.      i.            To provide knowledge and understanding of how economic policy alters environmental outcomes;
  2.    ii.            To develop an appreciation of the insights which economic analysis can bring to environmental issues;
  3.   iii.            To develop the ability to appraise investment projects using a variety of techniques such as environmental cost-benefit analysis;
  4.  iv.            To develop the knowledge of various international organisations that regulate and shape environmental outcomes and help to design and implement international environmental agreements;
  5.    v.            To develop an understanding of the techniques to evaluate environmental policy programmes;

 

Learning Outcomes:

 

By the end of this course students will be able to:

  1.          i.            Apply the basic economics principles used in environmental management
  2.        ii.            Use the economic tools for valuing environmental assets or damages
  3.       iii.            Distinguish between the challenges of working with renewable vs. non-renewable resources

 

Detailed Course Outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

Overview:1. Basic economic concepts (economic activity, choice, product possibility frontier, opportunity cost, competition, markets, scarcity, supply and demand, etc.)

  1. Overview of environmental economics
  2. What is environmental and natural resource economics?
  3. Why study economics and environmental economics?

8

2. Demand Theory:

  1. Utility
  2. Budget constraints
  3. Indifference curves as a measure of utility
  4. Utility maximization
  5. Derivation of demand curve using ordinal and cardinal approaches
  6. Demand functions and their properties
  7. Change in demand and a change in quantity demanded
  8. The concept of consumer surplus
  9. The concept of elasticity and its application
  10. Market demand and demand for environmental resources

6

3. Supply Theory:

  1. Production and the supply side of economic transactions
  2. Production function
  3. Graph of production function
  4. Marginal product (MP)
  5. Costs and cost functions
  6. Forms of costs
  7. Cost minimization
6
4. Markets and market failure:

  1. What is a market?
  2. Economic value of a market
  3. Markets and resource allocation
  4. Market-based tools (e.g. pollution permit trading
  5. Market failure

4

5.Profits and profit functions:

  1. Profit maximization
  2. Pitfalls of profit maximization in resource allocation

2

6.Scarcity, Efficiency, and Equity:

  1. Scarcity
  2. Efficiency
  3. Equity
  4. The four cornerstones of environmental and natural resource economics:
  5. Current decisions affect the future
  6. Economic decisions may have irreversible effects
  7. For many environmental resources markets don’t exist
  8. Economic optimality may depend on ecological response

6

7.Externalities and market failures:

  1. Interventions and measurement of market failures
  2. Subsidies, and command and control
  3. Polluter-Pays-Principle and Pigouvian taxes
  4. Public-Private-Partnerships
  5. Global warming problems
  6. Global warming
  7. Atmospheric change
  8. Trade and environment

6

8.Economics of renewable and non renewable resources and resource management

  1. Renewable resources, e.g. fish and forests
  2. Non-renewable resources, e.g. oil and minerals

6

9.Cost-Benefit Analysis Applications

  1. What is Benefit cost analysis?
  2. Benefit-Cost Ratio (BCR)
  3. The concept of discounting and why it is applied in project evaluation
  4. Evaluate the economics merit of a project.
  5. Compare competing projects
  6. Net Present value (NPV)
  7. Internal Rate of Return (IRR)

4

10.Valuation of natural resources:

  1. Environmental resources
  2. Values of environmental resources
  3. Methods of valuing environmental resources (valuing benefits, classifying valuation methods, valuing damage from groundwater contamination, tangible vs intangible benefits, cost-effectiveness analysis, etc.)
  4. Changes in productivity
  5. Limitations of environmental valuation

8

11. The concept of sustainability:

  1. Sustainable development
  2. Population and the environment
  3. World food production and the green revolution

4

Practicals

00

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

60

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Tutorials
  3. Field trips

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Tests (10%)
  2. Coursework (20%)
  3. End of semester exam (70%)

 

Reading List:

 

  1.       i.            Barlow, Raleigh (1972). Land Resource Economics Prentice Hall, Inc. New Jersey
  2.     ii.            Bernett H.J. and C. Morse (1963). Scarcity and Growth; The Economics of Natural Resource Availability, John Hopkins University Press Baltimore.
  3.    iii.            Brown Gardener M.J.R. and Barry Field (1979).  The Adequacy of Measures for Signaling the Scarcity of Natural Resources, in Smith, V Kerry (editor). Scarcity and Growth Reconsidered, the Johns Hopkins University Press Baltimore
  4.   iv.            Coase Ronald. The Problem of Social Costs. In: Robert Dorfman and Nancy Dorfman (editors).  Economics of Environment W. Norton and Company, Inc New York.
  5.     v.            Howe Charles, W. (1979). Natural Resources Economics. John Wiley and Sons N.Y

 

 

 

 

 

4.2 Second Semester:

 

COURSE NAME       :   GMT 2202 PROJECT PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT

CREDIT UNITS           :   3

 

Brief Course Description:

 

The course unit covers various strategies, processes and phases in project planning and management from the initial to the completion stage. It enables the student to acquire skills appropriate for planning and managing viable sustainable projects in a more effective manner.

 

Course Objectives:

 

  1. Define and explain project management and project leadership;
  2. Understand and apply the sequential steps of the project management framework;
  3. Understand the importance and function of project management and apply the project process of initiating, planning, executing, controlling and closing the project;
  4. Define the roles of the project manager, the project team member and effectively communicate with the project team, clients and customer (sponsor);
  5. Apply knowledge and skills to manage the project scope, project time and work flow, project cost and budgets, project resources, project quality, project human resource requirements, project communication (reports, meetings, correspondence, etc.) project changes and project risk management;
  6. Understand the critical people skills needed to lead projects. 

 

Learning Outcomes:

 

By the end of this course, the students should be able to:

 

  1.          i.            Describe the basic principles for project planning and management, and apply them to the management of environmental/natural resource management projects
  2.        ii.            Outline the criteria used for selecting environmental/natural resource management projects for funding and write project proposals that  can attract sponsorship
  3.      iv.            Explain how project cost estimates and project budget control for environmental/natural resource management projects are carried out
  4.        v.            Describe tools/techniques used during planning and management of environmental/natural resource management projects
  5.      vi.            Conduct Monitoring, Evaluation, and Impact Assessments of environmental/natural resource management projects.
  1. Identify skills and project assets/requirements from the locally available resources

 

Detailed Course Outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1.Overview of Project Planning and Management (PPM)

  1. General introduction about the course unit
  2. Definition of key concepts: project, planning, management, project environment, project life cycle, project visions, missions and objective, project organization
  3. Project  rationale
  4. The relationship between projects and development
4
2. Project cycle

  1. Traditional (top-down approach, centralized decision-making, etc.) and new project (listening, piloting, demonstration, mainstreaming)
  2. Planning and management stages: Identification, Preparation, Cost Budgeting, Appraisals, Implementation, Monitoring and Evaluation, Feedback
4
3. Management phases and related aspects

  1. Management phases
  2. Functions of management
  3. Responsibilities of project managers
  4. Characteristics of projects
  5. Project as a conversion process
  6. Project environment
  7. Benefits, aims/objective, justification expected outcomes and activities
4
  1. 4. Implementation processes
  2. Implementation tools
  3. Activity identification, time scheduling, charts
  4. Organizational responsibilities
  5. Challenges and problems of implementation
8
5.Project tools and assessment techniques

  1. Project problem identification/SWOT analysis
  2. Cost/Benefit ratio analysis
  3. The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)
  4. Logical Framework approach: input, output, purpose
  5. Bar charts advantages and limitation
  6. Ghantt charts, PERTS
  7. Project planning and control using Activity Network Diagrams (using the Critical Path Method)
  8. Technical, Social, economic and financial assessment
9
6.Feasibility study and proposal writing

  1. Project proposal and feasibility study title
  2. Executive summary, background, problems and needs
  3. Project description/statement of the project beneficiaries
4
7.Estimation, resource analysis, justification and evaluation using non-financial and financial methods

  1. Justification/Appraisal techniques: discounting and non discounting techniques, Payback  period, Cash flow statement, NPV, Cost benefit ratio & IRR
  2. Resource analysis and pricing
  3. Budgeting
4
8.Risks & uncertainties and control of projects

  1. Identification of risks
  2. Categories, sources of uncertainties
  3. Means and ways of identification
  4. Risk analysis and managing risks
  5. Control of major constraints; cost, time and environmental
4
9. Definitions and importance of Monitoring, Evaluation, Feedback and Impact Assessment of environmental/natural resource management projects; types of Monitoring/Evaluation/Impact Assessments; strengths/weaknesses of External and Participatory Monitoring/Evaluation finding and taking corrective action based on the findings (feedback)

4

Practicals

00

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

45

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Case studies
  3. Group/Individual discussions, assignments, and presentations

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Tests (10%)
  2. Coursework (20%)
  3. End of semester exam (70%)

 

Reading List

  1. Grisham, W.T.  (2008). International Project Management: Leadership in complex environments.
  2. Melton, T. (2008).  Real Project Planning: Developing a project delivery strategy. 1st Edn (2008). Elzevier Ltd.
  3. OSPMI (2007). Project Risk Management Handbook:  Threats and opportunities. Offic of Statewide Project Management Improvement (OSPMI).
  4. Rad, P.F. Vittal S. Anantatmula (2005). Project Planning Techinicians. Management Concepts Inc., USA
  5. Rose K (2005). Project Quality Management: Why, what and how – J. Ross Publishing, Inc.

 

 

COURSE NAME      :  GMT 2201 RESEARCH METHODS

CREDIT UNITS         :   3

 

Brief Course Description:

 

This course unit covers the fundamentals of the research process ranging from the conception of research ideas, through proposal writing, data collection and analysis, to presentation and publication. It will enable the students to apply this research process to conduct research.

 

Course Objectives:

 

The objectives of this course unit are three-fold.

 

  1. To help students develop a thorough understanding of the fundamental theoretical ideas and logic of research. These fundamental ideas underpin our approach to research, the vast range of research methods available and the researcher’s choice of methods.
  2. To help students develop a thorough understanding of the issues involved in planning, designing, executing, evaluating and reporting research.
  3. To introduce you to many of the technical aspects of how to do empirical research using some of the main data collection and analysis techniques used by researchers.

 

Learning Outcomes:

 

By the end of this course unit student should be able to:

  1.          i.            Explain the processes involved in research
  2.        ii.            Differentiate among the types of research
  3.       iii.            Formulate research proposals
  4.      iv.            Collect, process and analyze primary and secondary data and write standard and coherent research reports
  5.        v.            Identify, examine, and apply research ethics in the field
  6.      vi.            Learn the techniques to produce documents professionally

 

Detailed Course Outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1. Overview:Definition of terms and stages of research

2

2. Concept stage:

  1. Introduction to values and concepts of research; Scientific thinking and organizational studies; Styles of thinking; Sources of knowledge; Thought processes of reasoning, deduction, and their combination; Propositions and hypotheses
  2. Types of research
  3. Scientific research process approach
  4. The research problem (meaning, phrasing, characteristics, qualities)
  5. Tool/data-driven problems; Formulating the research problem; steps in preparing a research investigation; pilot study and its advantages; planning for computer analysis and data processing

10

3. Research Proposal:

  1. Designing research objectives, questions and hypotheses
  2. Reviewing relevant literature
  3. Research methodology development strategies –  Scientific design, Sampling techniques, choice of study area and sample size
  4. Source of data – collection and instrumentation; primary data sources; secondary data sources; survey methods; mailed questionnaires and interviews; survey instruments; attitude scaling; observations; evaluating tests; validity analysis; reliability analysis; factor scales
  5. Measurement; Measurement scales; nominal scales; Ordinal scales; ratio scales; Source of measurement differences; Validity; Reliability; Practicability
  6. Sampling design; Types of sample design; Probability sampling; Steps; Systematic sampling; Stratified sampling; cluster sampling; Double sampling
  7. Survey instruments; Question hierarchy; Survey strategy and schedule design; Question content and wording; Response structure and question sequence
  8. Laboratory and field scientific measurements

16

4. Data Collection and Analysis

  1. Researched data analysis tools – Relevant statistical analyses of scientific data
  2. Hypothesis testing; Testing approaches; Statistical significance; Types of statistical tests (measure of central tendency and variability, Z-test, critical ratio, t-test, chi-square, etc.); Multi-variable statistical procedures
  3. Concepts of accuracy, precision, replication, pseudo-replication
  4. Ethics in research; Deception and informed consent; Ethics and client; Quality research; Protection of anonymity; Resources for ethical awareness

8

5.Writing up research report

  1. Writing up research report and reporting findings of researched data (written and oral reporting)
  2. Referencing – information search and the use of databases in research; Referencing and citation nomenclature; Avoiding plagiarism

6

6. Presentation and publication

3

Practicals

00

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

45

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Group discussions
  3. Student’s presentations

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Written reports (20%)
  2. Oral presentation (10%)
  3. End of semester exam (70%)

 

Reading List

  1. Buckland, S.T., (1993).  Distance Sampling: Estimating Abundance of Biologicak Populations.  Chapman & Hall, London
  2. Campbell, R.C. (1989). “Statistics for Biologists”, University Press, Cambridge –
    1. Great Britain
  3. Clarke, M.G. (1980). “Statistics and Experimental Design” By Edward Arnold Publishers Ltd. 41 Bedford Sqaure, London
  4. Davies Owen & Goldsmith, P. (Eds.) (1974).  Statistics Methods in Research and Production. Longman, New York.
  5. Fowler Jim Cohen, L. & Jarvis, P.(1998).  Practical Statistics for Field Biology. John     Wiley & Sons, London.

 

 

COURSE NAME   :  BSE 2201 ENVIRONMENTAL LAW AND ETHICS

CREDIT UNITS      :   3

 

Brief Course Description:

 

The course explores the values, rights, responsibilities and status of entities underlying legal, policy and ethical approaches to environmental issues at national, regional, and international levels. It helps the students in understanding the intricacies of the operations of various underlying legal and ethical approaches to environmental issues.

 

Course Objectives:

 

  1. Demonstrate the importance of interdisciplinary nature of environmental and health risk Assessment;
  2. The ability to develop a document in Environmental Assessment or Environmental Impact Statement
  3. Make aware of professional development, life-long learning, and current global and

contemporary issues in environmental and health risk assessment

  1.      iv.            Make aware of professionalism, ethics, and environmental laws and regulations Outcomes

 

Learning Outcomes:

 

By the end of the course students should be able to:

  1. Appreciate and explain the rationale for the existence, operation and limitations of legal, policy, and ethical approaches to environmental issues, and the various procedures that should be followed in the day-to-day environmental conservation initiatives
  2. Critically examine environmental laws and treaties

 

Detailed Course Outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1.Introduction

  1. Definition and concepts Environmental Law
  2. General principles of Environmental Law

3

2. International Environmental treaties, conventions and laws

4

3. Guiding principles in the development of a Legal Framework for Environmental Management

4

4. Environmental rights and duties: Vertical and Horizontal Application

4

5.Environmental Issues in Uganda

  1. Policy issues (Application of national law, decision making and agenda setting, policy formulation, monitoring and evaluation, appraisal)
  2. The environmental laws of Uganda

8

6. Public Interest litigation in Environmental Law

4

7. Criminal aspects of Environmental Law

4

8. Challenges in monitoring and enforcement of Environmental Laws in Uganda

4

9. Environmental Ethics

10

Practicals

00

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

45

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Group discussions
  3. Case studies

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Coursework (30%)
  2. End of semester exam (70%)

 

Reading list:

  1. The Ugandan Constitution. 1995
  2. Ogolla-Bondi (1987). “Role of Environmental Law in Development”. Journal of the Indian Law Institute Vol. 29.
  3. Struhl Karsten, J. and Struhl Paula, R. (1975). Ethics in Perspective. New York : London House.
  4. Lejeune, M. and Rosemann, P.W. (1996). Business Ethics in the African Context Today. Kampala. Konrad Adeneur Foundation and Uganda Martyrs University.
  5. MC Eldowney, J. and MC Eldowney, S. (1996). Environment and the Law. An         Introduction   for Environmental Scientists and Lawyers. London: Pitman.

 

COURSE NAME   :   BSE 2202 CARBON TRADING

CREDIT UNITS      :    4

 

Course description:

 

As climate change has emerged as one of the critical issues of our time, emissions trading have emerged as arguably the preferred policy tool to achieve reductions in greenhouse global emissions. This course unit provides an overview of how emissions trading works in a global context and examines the critical design features of International, National/State, voluntary and inter company emissions trading schemes, an analysis of the key drivers for carbon prices/volumes, Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) project structure, an introduction to carbon based finance and an analysis of how companies benefit from emissions trading.

 

Objectives:

  1. Gain knowledge on the Carbon Farming Initiative and the practicalities of implementing abatement projects
  2. Practical ways to reduce agricultural emissions through changes to land management, while increasing production and sequestering carbon in the landscape.
  3. Navigate implementation issues of land based abatement projects
  4. Utilise the latest online tools provided government for mapping, calculating abatement and assessing re-aforestation projects
  5. Apply carbon trading mechanics within the Ugandan context

Expected learning outcome:

 

At the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1.                      i.            Understand the ““Low Carbon Transition Plan”
  2.                    ii.            Demonstrate the activities of exchanges
  3.                   iii.            Explain what carbon footprint is and the concept of green trading
  4.                  iv.            Explain the impact on future developments
  5.                    v.            Explain what Carbon Credits and Renewable Portfolio Standards

 

Detailed Course outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1.Introduction to Emissions Markets:

  1. Climate change basics
  2. State and trends of the carbon markets
  3. Emissions trading basics
  4. Carbon footprints
  5. Understanding the sources of liability in a carbon-constrained world

6

2.Emissions Trading Schemes:

  1. Key issues in the design of an emissions trading scheme. Permit allocation, liability, coverage, target setting, vintages etc.
  2. Kyoto instruments
  3. National/State Level Schemes
  4. Voluntary Schemes ( Chicago Climate Exchange , Canada Emission Reduction Trading)
  5. How do companies benefit from carbon trading?

6

3.Clean Development Mechanism (CDM):

  1.          i.            Basic concept of CDM
  2.        ii.            CDM project structure
  3.       iii.            Basic legal documentation required for carbon projects
  4.      iv.            CDM technology options
  1. Case study: CDM project development opportunities in Uganda.

10

4.Emissions Reductions Purchase Agreement (ERPA):

  1.          i.            ERPA Key Terms
  2.        ii.            ERPA structure
  3.       iii.            Price: Different approaches in practice
  4.      iv.            Elements of risk in carbon deals
  1. Case study – Carbon arbitrage: A trader’s paradise?

20

5.Carbon Finance:

  1. Sources of environmental finance
  2.  Emerging environmental commodity markets
  3. Relative importance of various financing sources for climate change
  4. Impact of carbon finance on project financing
  5. Facilitating carbon market deepening

10

6.The Economics of Climate Change:

  1. The standard theory of externalities
  2. The Stern report
  3. The economic and environmental consequences of climate change in both developed and developing countries and the implication of climate volatility on financial instruments such as weather derivatives and catastrophe bonds.

8

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

60

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Group discussions
  3. Case studies
  4. Field trips

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Tests (10%)
  2. Coursework (20%)
  3. End of semester exam (70%)

 

Reading list:

 

  1. Ali Dada, Thorsten Staake, and Felix von Reischach. Displaying dynamic carbon footprints of products on mobile phones. In Adjunct Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Pervasive Computing (Pervasive 2008), pages 119–121, May 2008.
  2. CarbonLimited Programme. Carbon limited briefing paper. Technical report, Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures & Commerce, 2007.
  3. Center for Embedded Networked Sensing, University of California, Los Angeles. Personal environmental impact report website. http://peir.cens.ucla.edu/, December 17 2008.
  4. CoreWriting Team, Rajendra K. Pachauri, and Andy Reisinger, editors. Climate Change 2007: Synthesis Report. Contribution of Working Groups I, II and III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. IPCC, Geneva, Switzerland, 2007.
  5. Marshini Chetty, David Tran, and Rebecca E. Grinter. Getting to green: understanding resource consumption in the home. In UbiComp ’08: Proceedings of the 10th international conference on Ubiquitous computing, pages 242–251, New York, NY, USA, 2008. ACM.

 

 

COURSE TITLE           :  BSE 2203 ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATICS

CREDIT UNITS              :  4

 

Course Description:

 

This course unit provides an overview and critical evaluation of the emerging field of Environmental Informatics for students from a range of first degree backgrounds.  Students are asked to consider EI not necessarily as a sub-discipline of Informatics? But as an interdisciplinary area which can and is producing innovative theoretical outputs and valuable technical solutions. The peculiarities of environmental data/information are highlighted and the disciplines are identified within the environmental, social, information and computing sciences which contribute to EI. The course emphasizes the need to explore and exploit these disciplines in order to deliver accurate, reliable, timely and understandable environmental information.

 

Objectives:

 

The objectives of this course unit are to:

  1. Educate students on how to store, process, and flow of information collected from or modeled after environmental systems.
  2. Educate students on the scope, and survey frameworks and emerging developments.
  3. To educate students on how to examine the compatibility of existing environmental datasets with current technologies,
  4. Identify processes that deal with challenges in this field such as data gaps, performance and scaling.
  5. Have an innovation component comprising brainstorming and prototyping.

 

Expected learning outcome:

 

On completion of this course unit, students will be able to:

 

  1. Make requirements for environmental information by end users;
  2. Apply key sources of environmental data and the unique properties of that data;
  3. Play the role of EI as a catalyst for the integration of data, information and knowledge from different disciplines, organisations and sectors.

 

Detailed Course outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1. Historical developments, current approaches and future directions in EI.

4

2. Theories, concepts, techniques and technologies.

4

3. Precedents from other information pathways? E.g. developments in bioinformatics, hydro informatics and commercial data/information systems.

8

4. Data acquisition, processing, modelling, assimilation, interpretation, dissemination, presentation.

8

5. Challenges: we will identify and discuss appropriate strategies to remove, avoid or minimize challenges to the function of environmental information systems. Challenges might include:

  1.          i.            crossing/closing data gaps,
  2.        ii.            hardware or software performance optimization,
  3.       iii.            scaling, (d) usability,
  4.      iv.            visualization,
  5.        v.            help systems,
  6.      vi.            network storage, security and data safety, and
  7.     vii.            Standardization vs customization.

15

6.Information Systems and Technologies:

  1.          i.            Survey of  information systems and technologies that have been applied to environmental datasets (case studies), and
  2.        ii.            Analysis of successes and failures. (Care should be taken, seeking parallelism with other informatics disciplines such as bioinformatics).
  3.       iii.            Convergence of existing environmental information systems with emerging systems and technologies.

6

Practicals

30

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

60

 

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Practicals
  3. Field visits

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Coursework (15%)
  2. Field report writing and presentation (15%)
  3. End of semester exam (70%)

 

Reading list:

  1.          i.            Introduction to Geographic Information Systems with Data Files CD-ROM by Kang-tsung Chang, McGraw-Hill (Hardcover – Jan. 16, 2009).
  2.        ii.            Introduction to Remote Sensing, by James B. Campbell, The Guilford Press, (4th edition) (Paperback – Oct 28, 2008).
  3.       iii.            Remote Sensing and GIS Integration Theories, Methods, and Applications, by Qihao Weng, McGraw Hill, 2009, 007160653X / 9780071606530.
  4.      iv.            Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems (7th Edition) by Efraim Turban, Jay E. Aronson, and Ting-Peng Liang, Prentice Hall (Hardcover – April 18, 2004).
  5.        v.            Remote Sensing of the Environment: An Earth Resource Perspective, by Jensen, John R., Prentice Hall, (Hardcover – 2000).

 

COURSE NAME     : GMT 2204 INTERNSHIP

CREDIT UNITS        :  3

 

Brief Course Description:

 

The Field Attachment is an important course unit which enables the student to apply theoretical knowledge and see it being applied by others more experienced in the field. This exposure is vital for internalization of knowledge and practical experience. Students must be supervised by the field and academic supervisors at their field attachment sites.

 

Course Objectives:

 

The overall objective of this course unit is to equip the students with knowledge and skills needed for conducting and making scientific reports. It also aims at guiding the students to develop local and critical thinking as well as analytical capabilities in action research.

 

Learning Outcomes:

 

By the end of this course the student should be able to:

  1. To understand how classroom knowledge applies to the real world
  2. To keep a detailed logbook of experiences
  3. To write a scientific/technical report of work done according to an accepted format

 

Requirements for Field Attachment:

 

A well kept log-book, onsite supervisor assessment form, faculty supervisor assessment form, and written report of the Field Attachment experience is expected from each student.

 

Modes of Assessment:

 

Field attachment report (100%)

 

THIRD YEAR

5.1 First Semester:

 

COURSE NAME     :  BSE 3101 RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES 

CREDIT UNITS        :   4

Brief Course Description:

 

This course unit introduces students to key issues in energy resources and technologies. It is an overview of renewable energy sources and focuses on energies with high development potential. It helps students to understand and apply both renewable and non-renewable energy resources concepts in the field, and also enables them to appreciate the need to conserve energy and use it sustainably.

 

Course Objectives:

 

  1.          i.            To discuss various renewable power options which vary in technological sophiscation;
  2.        ii.            To compare the various renewable and non-renewable power technologies in terms of economics, environmental impacts, and social acceptability;
  3.       iii.            To present a methodologies on how to determine a viability of renewable power project;
  4.      iv.            To review the status of renewable powers in selected areas and emerging countries.

 

Expected Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the fundamentals and main characteristics of renewable energy sources and their differences,
  2. Explain the technological basis for harnessing renewable energy sources,
  3. Recognize the effects that current energy systems have over the environment and the society,
  4. Compare different renewable energy technologies,
  5. Discuss how to utilize local energy resources.

 

Detailed Course Outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1. Overview of energyEnergy concepts, forms of energy, energy requirements, historical and current energy consumption

6

2. Energy crises: global and national

  1. Trends in energy use and their implications (indigenous and current knowledge)
  2. Energy generation and use, use and impacts on the environment, interactions between energy, pollution, environment and health
  3. Energy costs and conservation and sustainable energy development
  4. Energy policies and laws at national and international levels
 

 

 

 

 

8

3. Renewable energy sources:

  1. Hydropower generation
  2. Using different types of turbines e.g. Kaplan, Pelton, Francis, etc.
  3. Types of turbines and their operations, set-up and vital parameter calculations involved.
  4. Advantages and disadvantages
  5. Wind energy generation
  6. Types of turbines: This unit outlines the components of a wind turbine; examines the interaction of wind and rotor; consider fatigue; and reviews the process of electricity generation and supply to the grid (wind farms)
  7. Wind turbines installation and calculations involved
  8. Uses of wind energy
  9. Solar energy
  10. Photovoltaic: This unit examines the basics of converting sunlight into electricity; the behaviour of solar cells; cell properties; system components; applications
  11. Solar Thermal Applications: This component reviews the applications of solar thermal energy collectors for water heating, steam generation and solar thermal-electricity
  12. PVC calculations involved
  13. Biomass energy
  14. Firewood, animal dung, etc.
  15. Agricultural crops and biomass wastes in the production of alternative fuels.
  16. Biogas
  17. Biofuels: Ethanol production technology, from both yeasts and bacteria including genetically engineered microorganisms (GMOs) and all the issues that this raises for large-scale ethanol production are considered as well as methane via biogas technology
  18. Geothermal energy
  19. Geysers, steam power, etc.
  20. Tidal and wave energy
  21. Comparison and calculations of calorific values for renewable  energy systems
  22. Energy efficiency and sustainability
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

26

4. Non-renewable energy sources

  1. Fossil fuels, Nuclear, etc.
  2. Installation and calculations involved

5

Practicals

30

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

60

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Computer exercises (e.g. RETscreen, PVGIS)
  3. Practicals

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Tests (10%)
  2. Coursework (20%)
  3. End of semester exam (70%)

 

Reading List

  1.          i.       Askatchewen mineral resources (2001). Energy Resource Management in Saskatchewan.
  2.       iii.     Management of Energy Actity for profit symposium, 1986 presented at the Ninth Annual Energy-sources Technology Conferences and Exhibition, Menu Orieans, Lousiana published by ASME, 1986.
  1. Energy Resources and Management Based on the first UMR – MEC conference on Energy resources Held at Rulla, mission Published by Department    of Chemistry, university of Missouri-Rolla, 1974.
  1. Robert E. Aulbach, George R. Conrade (1988).   Energy and Water Resource ManagementPublished by Educational Institute of the American Hotel and Motel Association.
  2. UNEP hand book for drafting Laws on Energy, Efficiency and Renewable Energy by United Nations Environment published by UNEP/Earth print (2007).

 

COURSE NAME     :  BSE 3102 EIA AND ENVIRONMENTAL AUDITING

CREDIT UNITS        :   4

 

Brief Course Description:

 

This course unit provides students with a basic understanding of environmental impact assessment (EIA) and environmental auditing (EA) in developmental project planning. It highlights the importance of these processes on the state of the environment.

 

Course Objectives:

The following are the major objectives of this course unit:

  1. To educate students on conditions of project approval are implemented satisfactorily;
  2. To impart on students knowledge to realise that impacts are within predicted or permitted limits;
  3. To teach students on how to take action to manage unanticipated impacts or other unforeseen changes;
  4. To ensure that environmental benefits are maximised through good practice; and
  5. To make students learn from experience in order to improve EIA process and practice.

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of this course students should be able to:

  1. Describe various aspects of the EIA and EA processes highlighting the importance of these processes on the environment
  2. Review the processes and underlying principles of EIA and EA
  3. Apply EIA and EA principles in project planning and management
  4. Prepare EIA reports
  5. Assess existing EIA and EA reports

 

Detailed Course Outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1.Basic concepts and definitions of  Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) and Environmental Auditing (EA)

  1. Background to EIA and EA
  2. Key environmental resources
  3. Key threats to environmental resources

8

2. Role and benefits of EIA and EA

  1. Functions of EIA and EA
  2. Direct and indirect benefits
  3. Challenges of EIA

4

3. EIA and EA guiding principles (e.g. participatory, transparency, flexibility, practicality, credibility, certainty, etc.)

4

4. EIA and EA scope and processes

  1. Extent
  2. Steps in the EIA process
  3. Types of EA
  4. Steps in the EA process

12

Framework for EIA and EA in Uganda

  1. Legal basis for EIA and EA in Uganda (relevant standards and working documents, etc.)
  2. Guidelines for EIA and EA in Uganda
 

8

6. EIA and sustainable development

4

7. Stakeholders participation in the EIA process

5

Practicals

30

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

60

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Field trips
  3. EIA and EA projects
  4. Field trips

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Coursework (10%)
  2. Sample EIA report (20%)
  3. End of semester exam (70%)

 

Reading List:

 

  1. Christopher wood, Chris wood (2002). Environmental Impact Assessment: A comparative Review Published by Prentice Hall.
  2. John Glasson, Riki Therivel, Andrew Chadwick (2005), Introduction to Environmental Impact Assessment. Tayler and Francis.
  3. Judith Petts (1999). Handbook of environmental Impact Assessment Blackwell Publishing.

 

COURSE TITLE           : BSE 3102 INDIGENOUS TECHNICAL KNOWLEDGE

CREDIT UNITS                        : 3

 

Course Description:

The course unit introduces the different techniques, which are used by the local people in different cultures in sustainably managing the environment.  It introduces the students to traditional environmental knowledge, indigenous soil and water conservation, survival of traditional techniques, traditional forest management techniques, development project use of medicinal herbs, and case studies.

 

Course Objectives:

The specific objectives are to:

  1. Identify different traditional environmental methods, which were in the past and those used today by local people.
  2. Compare traditional techniques and the current westernised methods in effectiveness of environmental management.
  3. Identify reasons why certain indigested techniques have persisted in some parts while they have disappeared in other regions.
  4. Examine the role of culture in management of the environment and its resources.

 

Expected Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course participants should be able to:

  1. Critically examine Indigenous Technical knowledge.
  2. Understand and apply the principles and mechanisms of Indigenous Technical knowledge.
  3. Demonstrate ability in right-based Indigenous Technical knowledge.
  4. Undertake correct research and prepare education plan quality management reports that influence Indigenous Technical knowledge.

 

Detailed course outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1. Introduction to the concept of indigenous environmental knowledge

  1. History of indigenous  environmental knowledge
  2. Comparing indigenous environmental knowledge with western science
  3. Reconciling world views

 

6

2. Indigenous approaches to natural resource conservation

  1. soil and water (water harvesting techniques, traditional farming practices)
  2. Forest
  3. Farm lands
  4. New approaches

 

6

3. Indigenous agricultural knowledge and extension for example in Southern Sudan as a case study

4

4. Gender in Environment conservation

4

5. Conditions for survival of indigenous technical knowledge : Where and why ITK has been abandoned (reasons)
6. The transfer of indigenous water soil conservation

4

7. Traditional forest management techniques

  1. Indigenous technical knowledge of tree management
  2. The role of indigenous organization in decision making for development
  3. Management of common property natural resources
  4. Incorporating farmer’s knowledge in international rice research
  5. Ethno – veterinary medicine
  6. Indigenous crop pest management
  7. Potential and practice

6

8. Indigenous knowledge and development project and case studies

  1. Hybrid maize in Zambia
  2. Traditional rain-fed project in Chad
  3. Rice irrigation project in Timbukutu, Mali
  4. Neem biopesticides in Niger
  5. Hindu water temple and rice production in Bali

5

9. Vetireria use for water and moisture control in India and Rwanda

4

10. Role of cultural ethics in Environment Management

6

Practicals

00

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

45

 

Teaching and Learning Methods

  1.                      i.            Lectures
  2.                    ii.            Group Discussions
  3.                   iii.            Fieldtrips
  4.                  iv.            Seminars/Workshops
  5.                    v.            Case studies and analysis

 

Assessment:

The course unit assessment is based on coursework, tests and final exams. The overall assessment within this study will consist of:

  1.                      i.             Coursework                                                            20%
  2.                    ii.            Group work presentation                                           10%
  3.                   iii.            End of Course Unit Examination                               70%

 

Reading List:

 

  1. Charles Zerner (2000) People, Plants and justice:  The politics of nature conservation Published by Columbia University Press.
  2.  Johan Pottier (1993) Practicing Development: Social Science Perspectives published by Routledge.
  3. David Brokensha, Dennis M. Warren and Owald Werner (1980). Indigenous knowledge systems and Development. University Press of America,
  4. Paul Sillitoe (2000). Indigenous knowledge Development:  in present and future.

 

 

 

 

COURSE TITLE           : BSE 3104 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

CREDIT UNITS                        : 4

 

Course Description:

This course unit covers a popular and very marketable field. It deals in the first with simple definitions of key terminologies frequently used in Environmental Health, and starts on issues of pollution (global and regional).

 

The second part covers issues of terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric pollution, waste and their effect on the health of the environment.  The role of this science in the Health services is highlighted, as are pests and vectors.

 

The final part of the course unit covers more advanced issues such as aesthetics, allergies, diseases (current, emerging and  re-emerging), food borne, etc, cultural influences, laboratory aspects of managing environmental health, Geographical Information system, etc.

 

Course Objective:

  1. To train students to actively involve them-selves in designing environmental health policy, legislation, standards and guidelines related to environmental health disciplines.
  2. To train students to be capable of developing and executing appropriate low cost environmental health technologies for communities.
  3. To produce competent students who will be engaged in teaching environmental health sciences and technologies in health training schools and other settings.
  4. To educate students on planning, organizing coordinating, monitoring and evaluating environmental health services and programs in the country.
  5. To train with adequate insight the Environmental Health aspects of applied research so that many of the rudimentary environmental related health problems will have practical solutions.
  6. To train students with insights and capabilities of linking environmental problems to health and well-being issues.

Expected Learning Outcomes:

 

At the end of the course participants should be able to:

i.            Critically examine Environmental Health

ii.            Apply the principles and mechanisms of Environmental Health

iii.            Demonstrate ability in right-based Environmental Health

iv.            Undertake correct research and prepare education plan quality management reports that influence Environmental Health.

 

Detailed Course Outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1.Introductioni.Definitions/terminologies of:- Environment, Health, Good health (WHO),

ii.Environmental Health,  The Biosphere, etc.

iii.Importance of a healthy environment

iv.Environmental Pollution (air, water, soil, noise, etc).

v.Global pollution:-   Global warming, Bioterrorism, Nuclear accidents/wars.

vi.Pollution of Environment in Africa

vii.Degradation and pollution of soils;-   Animal activity, Human activity

 

8

2. Toxic Chemicals and Human Health

2

3. Environmental and Occupational Sampling and Analysis

3

4. Water, Wastewater and Health

3

5. Hazardous Waste Management

3

6. Air Pollution: – Industrial – (Acid rain and Climatic, haze from Sahel,i.Exhaust, Fires, etc) sources.

  1. Pollution of aquatic systems to;-   Eutrophication, Industrial effluents –
  2. (breweries, tanneries),  Farm effluents (fertilizers, silting), Oil tankers,
  3. Sources of water and their contamination,  etc.

v.Pests/vectors in environmental health;-  Types , Prevention, Control.

vi.Restoration of degraded systems for health:- Challenges – air, water, soils, range

  1. Garbage/waste and environmental health, etc:-  Collection, storage, disposal.
  2. Role of environmental health in health services;- Good habitation, Safe

vii.water practices

 

16

7. Special interests in the management of the Environment e.g HIV SARS, Avian influenza, food poisoning, concurrencies of Bacterial and Viral organisms in the Environment.

4

8. Diseases of public health importance:-  Infectious diseases, Non communicable diseases, Emerging and re-emerging disease ( Ebola, Sars, Bird flu, etc.), Food borne illnesses, etc. 

6

Practicals

30

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

60

 

Teaching and learning Methods:

  1. Lectures
  2. Group discussions
  3. Fieldtrips
  4. Assignments for case studies and analysis
  5. Short one day Field visits to Fishing village, Sewerage works, Lake Shore, Industrial area etc

 

Assessment

Group work seminar presentation            10%

  1. Course work                              10%
  2. Class Test                                10%
  3. Terminal Examination                 70%

 

Reading List:

 

  1. Barbara Salter, Jane Lipscomb (2003). Environmental health and nursing practice.  Published by Springer Publishing Company. Inc.
  2. Cummins S, Macintyre S (2006) REVIEW Food environments and obesity—neighbourhood or nation? International Journal of Epidemiology 35:100–104.
  3. Dade W.Medller, (2005).  Environmental Health: Third Edition Harvard University Press.
  4. Frumkin H. (2002) Urban sprawl and public health. Public Health Reports 117:201-217.

 

COURSE TITLE                       : HRM 2103 OCCUPATIONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

CREDIT UNITS                                    : 4

 

Course description:

 

This course unit provides students with knowledge, skills and solid training in the theories and practices of occupational health and safety, emergency planning and environmental management. Graduates will have the foundations to create, plan, implement, audit and evaluate programs in the areas of health and safety, emergency planning and environmental management systems. This course unit will also interest individuals already working in safety-related positions who require broader legal and technical knowledge to function effectively in their occupation, or who would like to enhance their career in safety, or are planning to move into safety-related positions.

 

Course Objectives:

The course unit introduces the students to:

  1. Understand concept of risk assessment and management.
  2. Assess  environmental risks in the policy framework
  3. Enable public participation in the risk making decision process
  4. Understand Health impact of the various hazard management approaches and management strategies.

 

Expected learning outcome:

 

On completion of this course, graduates will have reliably demonstrated ability to:

  1. Develop, implement and evaluate organizational health and safety policies and practices utilizing effective collaboration skills that adhere to government legislation, regulations and guidelines;
  2. Apply theories and laws of health and safety to ensure legal compliance, to reduce accidents and to train and lead others in creating a safe work environment;
  3. Conduct critical incident reviews, accident investigations, incident command and root cause analysis in a variety of workplaces;
  4. Apply the principles of industrial hygiene to recognize, evaluate and control biological, physical and chemical hazards in the workplace;
  5. Create, propose and evaluate programs which provide an organization with due diligence in emergency response planning, toxicology prevention and/or risk management;

Detailed course outlined:

TOPIC

CH

1. Introduction to occupational and environment health

4

2.Identification of occupational health problems and their impacts on health

  1. Chemical and gaseous hazards
  2. Biological health hazards and their effects on health
  3. Physical hazards and their effects on health
  4. Water pollution
  5. Air pollution
  6. Food poisoning

 

12

3. Multinational diagnostic and intervention strategies regarding health risk at work place

4

4. Accident Prevention Theory and Risk Management

6

5. Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology

8

6. Emergency Response Planning and Fire Prevention

6

7. Disability Management, Ergonomics and Wellness

6

8. Occupational Health risk assessment and Safety Management Systems

6

9. Evaluating environmental measures.                                                               

8

10.Practicals

00

Total contact hours

60

 

Teaching and Learning Methods

  1. Lectures
  2. Discussions
  3. Field trips
  4. Tutorials

 

Assessment

The overall assessment within this course of study will consist of:

i.            Course work (Take Home Essay)                                   10%

ii.            Class Test                                                        10%

iii.            Group work presentation                         10%

iv.            Examination                                                      70%

 

Reading List

  1. Aldrich Mark (1997). Safety First.  History of the American workplace John Hoptkins University Press.
  2. Hammer Willie.  (2000). Occupational Safety Management and Engineering.  5th Ed. Prentice Codes, Laws, responsibility, personnel, hazardous situations
  3. Henderson, Helene. (1999). Workplace Health and Safety SourceBook.  Omnigraphics. A reference to assist readers in identifying hazards in the workplace.
  4. Manuele Fred, A. (1997). On the Practice of Safety.  2nd ed. Wiley. Comprehensive Review of the principles and Practices of the Safety profession
  5. Reese Charles, D.D. (2000). Accident/Incident Prevention Techniques.  Routledge.
  6. An A– Z guide to building a safety program in the workplace.

 

COURSE NAME                    : BSE 3106 BASIC AND CONSERVATION GENETICSCREDIT UNITS                     : 4

 

Course Description:

 

This is a good basic course unit for environment students, particularly those aspiring to take on fields associated with conservation: tourism; wildlife; forestry; agriculture and fisheries.  The course unit goes through basics (terminology, history) and then clarifies the genetics of extinction.   Students are then introduced to Darwinist concept of natural selection and adaptation.

 

Course Objective:                   

  1. To equip students with modern knowledge concerning conservation of genes among the organisms within ecosystems, so that the environment remains sustainable from one generation to another.
  2. To Help students appreciate how genetic materials (information) is passed on from one generation to another in a self perpetuating environment

 

Expected Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course unit participants should be able to:

i.            Critically examine basic and conservation genetics.

ii.            Apply the principles and mechanisms of basic and conservation genetics.

iii.            Demonstrate ability in right-based basic and conservation genetics.

iv.            Undertake correct research and prepare education plan quality management reports that influence basic and conservation genetics.

 

Detail Course Outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1. Important terms used in Genetics :

  1. Genes, chromosomes, locus, phenotype, genotype, heterozygotes, and
  2. homozygotes, variation, mutation, genome, alleles, co-dominance

 

6

2.Genetics and extinction:

  1. Genetics and the fate of endangered species
  2. Relationship between inbreeding and extinction
  3. Inbreeding and extinction in the wild
  4. Relationship between loss of genetic diversity and extinction

 

6

3.Evolution in large population (Natural selection and adaptation)

  1. Importance of genetic diversity
  2. Measuring genetic diversity
  3. Extent of genetic diversity
  4. Variation over space and time
  5. Genetic differences among species

 

6

4.Characterising genetic diversity; single loci

  1. Describing genetic diversity
  2. Frequencies of alleles and genotype
  3. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium
  4. Deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium
  5. Extensions of the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium

 

6

5. Evolution in large population (Natural selection and adaptation)

  1. The need to evolve
  2. Factors controlling the evolution of the population
  3. Selection and types

 

5

6. The evolution in large population (mutation, migration and their interactionwith selection)

  1. Factors controlling the evolution of populations
  2. Importance of mutation, migration, and their interactions
  3. With selection in conservation.
  4. Origin and regeneration of genetic diversity
  5. Selective value of mutations
  6. Mutation selection balance and mutation load
  7. Migration-selection equilibria and clines

 

7

7. Evolution in small populations

  1. Importance of small population in conservation biology
  2. Impact of small population size; chance effects
  3. Inbreeding, genetic consequences of inbreeding, mutation-selection balance with inbreeding and relationships between inbreeding, heterozygosity, genetic diversity and population size
  4. Measuring population size
  5. Mutation in small population
  6. Mutation – selection equilibrium in small population

 

6

8.Maintenance of genetic diversity

  1. Conservation of genetic diversity
  2. Fate of different classes of mutation
  3. Maintenance of genetic diversity in large population
  4. Select in intensities among characters
  5. Maintenance of genetic diversity in small populations

 

5

9.Loss of genetic diversity in small population

  1. Changes in genetic diversity over time
  2. Relationship between loss of genetic diversity and reduced fitness
  3. Effects of sustained population size restrictions on genetic diversity
  4. Relationship between population size and genetic diversity in wild populations

 

5

10. Genetics and management of wild and captive populations

  1. Genetic issues in wild populations
  2. Diagnosing genetic problems
  3. Genetic management of fragmented populations
  4. Introgression and hybridisation
  5. Stages in captive breeding and re-introduction
  6. Genetic management of captive populations
  7. Current genetic management of captive populations
  8. Ex-situ conservation of plants
  9. Managing inherited diseases in endangered species

 

8

Practicals

00

Total contact hours

60

 

Teaching and Learning Methods:

  1. Lectures
  2. Discussions
  3. Field trips
  4. Tutorials

 

Assessment:

The overall assessment within this course of study will consist of:

i.            Course work (Take Home Essay)                      30%

ii.            Examination                                                      70%

Total                                                                      100%

 

 

 

Reading List:

 

  1. A primer of conservation Genetics by Richard Frankham Johathon D. Balley, David Anthony Brisive, Korinop Published By  Cambridge University press,  2004
  2. Adams RP and Adams JE (1992).  Conservation of Plant Genes
  3. Frankharm, R.Ballou, JD and Briscoe A (2002), Introduction to Conservation Genetics
  4. Insect conservation Biology: Proceedings of the Royal Enrolmological society of London symposium, Aloin J.A Steware, T.R. New published by Cambridge university press 2002
  5. Plant conservation Genetics By Robert J.Henry contributor Robert J. Henry published by Haworth press, 2006
  6. A one-day visit to Entebbe (e.g.) natural forest of Ziika, Botanical gardens etc towards end of term (University Administration to arrange);

 

 

5.2 Second Semester:

 

COURSE NAME       :   GMT 3201 RESEARCH REPORT

CREDIT UNITS         :  3

 

Brief Course Description:

This is a final year case study and research project. The student articulates a topic on an area of concern for which answers/solutions to the identified problem must be empirically found out following principles of scientific methodology. The supervised research culminates in a written report or dissertation which is complemented by an oral presentation of study/research findings to an audience of peers and an examination panel of academics.

 

Course Objectives:

 

  1. To understand issues related to the research process – from general epistemology through to more detailed methods, via analysis of the demands of ‘good research’;

 

  1. To appreciate that research processes are situated within broader contexts – both in terms of disciplines (i.e., inter‐/trans‐disciplinary approaches) and in terms of personnel (i.e., multimember research teams) – and to understand how ‘traditional’ research processes must be amended, in light of these broader contexts, in order to complete high‐quality research;

 

  1. To execute effectively the research process (i) in this broader context (ii) by means of a research proposal in response to a ‘mock’ call for proposals; and

 

  1. To complete successfully a high‐quality research proposal (iii) while examining the details of a contemporary and critical sustainability/environmental/resource problem – namely, global climate change.

 

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this course the student should be able to:

  1. Write a scientific/technical report of work done according to an accepted format
  2. Collect, analyse and interpret data in real life situations

 

 

 

 

Detailed Course Outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1. Submission of concept paper or draft proposal and allocation of supervisors

5

2. Hold weekly meetings with supervisors

5

3. Proposal oral defence

5

4. Proposal revision, submit final soft and hardcopy
5. Weekly meetings with supervisors continue
6. Research data collection
7. Data analysis & Report writing
8. Start drafts submissions
9. Submit draft final report
10. Oral presentation
11. Submit final revised report soft and hardcopy
Practicals

60

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

45

 

Modes of delivery:

  1. Supervision
  2. Guided research study,
  3. Written reporting
  4. Presentation.

 

Modes of assessment:

Final Report (Originality, Content, Format, Quality) (100%)

 

Reading List

  1. Bell, J. (1999) Doing your Research Project: A Guide for First-Time Researchers in Education and Social Science, 3rd edition, Buckingham: Open University Press.
  2. Birley, G. and Moreland, N. (1998) A Practical Guide to Academic Research, Kogan Page: Condou.
  3. Blaxter, L., Hughes, C. and Tight, M. (2001) How to Research, 2nd edition, Buckingham: Open University Press.
  4. Clark, M., Riley, M. J., Wilkie, E., and Wood, R.C. (1998) Researching and Writing Dissertations in Hospitality and Tourism, International Thomson Business Press: London.

 

COURSE TITLE           : BSE 3202 PLANTS AND ANIMAL RESOURCES

CREDIT UNIT              : 4

 

Course description:    

           

This course unit is to enable the students acquire more knowledge about plants and animals (their structure and functions), and to help them appreciate the different species and their contribution to the proper functioning of ecosystems.

 

Course Objective:

i.            To help students to acquire information about the variety of important plants in Uganda.

ii.            To empower students to acquire skills for managing the plant resources for sustainable development.

iii.            To help students acquire knowledge about the important animal resources of Uganda.

iv.            Skills for managing the animal resources for sustainable development.

 

Expected Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course participants should be able to:

i.            Critically examine Plant Resources.

ii.            Demonstrate ability in right-based Plant resources.

iii.            Undertake correct research and prepare education plan quality management reports that influence Plant resources.

iv.            Critically examine animal resources

v.            Understand and apply the principles and mechanisms of animal resources.

vi.            Demonstrate ability in right-based animal resources.

vii.            Undertake correct research and prepare education plan quality management reports that influence animal resources.

 

Detail course outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1.    Introduction

  1.          i.      Characteristics of plants and animals
  2.        ii.      Classification of plants and animals

 

6

2.    Unique features of plants and animals and their importance 

8

3.   Important plant processes and interaction

  1.          i.      germination
  2.        ii.      pollination, reproduction, fertilization seed dispersal
  3.       iii.      Photosynthesis
  4.      iv.      Water relation of plants
  5.        v.      Interaction

 

8

3.      Important process in Animal’s

  1.          i.      Reproduction
  2.        ii.      Locomotion
  3.       iii.      Feeding
  4.      iv.      Behaviours – Sociality, communication, dispersion and movements
  5.        v.      Homeostasis – water and temperature effects
  6.      vi.      interactions

 

10

5.      plants for food, energy and environment

  1.          i.      Plants resources for food and fibre
  2.        ii.      Plants for energy
  3.       iii.      plants and the environment
  4.      iv.      important plant resources of Uganda

 

6

5.      Conservation of animals: Importance and types of conservation 

8

7.   Threats to plants and animals resources

  1. Herbivores
  2. Fire
  3. Man
  4. Diseases/Pests
  5. Natural disasters
  6. Introduction of species

 

14

Practicals

00

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

60

 

Reading List

  1. Campbell and Reece (2005). Biology (7th Ed) Benjamin/Cummings publishing Inc.
  2. Campbell, Meil, A. Campbell, Reece, Taylor, Richard M. Liebeare, and Simon, (2005) Biology concepts and connections
  3. Chapman and Reis (1992).   Ecology: Principles and Applications
  4. Chapman and Reis (1992). Ecology: Principles and Applications.
  5. Graham Ian (2004). Plants: A resource our world depends on:

 

 

COURSE NAME     :  BSE 3203 WETLANDS ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT

CREDIT UNITS       :  4

 

Brief Course Description:

 

The course unit covers key concepts of wetlands ecology and management as well as services and attributes of wetlands and the need to manage them sustainably. It introduces students to wetland as ecosystems and to the rationale for wetlands management. It emphasises key role of wetlands to forests, agriculture, communities, water conservation, and pollution control, among others.

 

Course Objectives:

The course unit introduces graduate students and upper level undergraduates to the principles of wetland science and our practices in managing them. An emphasis is on an ecosystem perspective. To become familiar with common properties of disparate wetland types, functions, or attributes. Other objectives are:

  1.          i.            To review current ecological paradigms, and examine how wetlands and wetland properties fit into these paradigms;
  2.        ii.            To develop and apply skills in the gathering and assessing of information about wetland science and about the multidisciplinary approach needed to undertake wetland investigations;
  3.       iii.            To critique current national and international policies dealing with the regulation and management of wetlands.

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this course students should be able to:

  1.          i.            Describe the importance and values of wetlands ecology and management
  2.        ii.            Identify the key issues and challenges of wetland management
  3.       iii.            Explain the importance of wetland assessment and monitoring in wetland management
  4.      iv.            Design and apply public awareness strategies in wetland management
  5.        v.            Explain the current policies and laws relating to wetland management

 

 

 

 

Detailed Course Outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1. Overview of wetland ecology and management

  1. definitions
  2. formation
  3. types of wetlands (natural and constructed)

4

2. Wetlands characteristics: hydrology, drainage, soils composition, geomorphology

2

3. Structure and functioning of wetlands: water-wetland-plant interaction; values of wetlands; products, functions, services, attributes

4

4. Wetland resources and their values/attributes

2

5. Economic valuation of wetland resources: definition; need for economic valuation; approach to wetland valuation; wetland economic benefits; valuing wetland goods and services

4

6. Assessing wetland health and functioning: variables used in assessing wetland functioning; tools used in wetland monitoring and predicting future changes

4

7. Wetland threats: direct and indirect; onsite and offsite impacts

2

8. Wetland management and conservation in Uganda: history, issues, challenges

  1. Laws and policies protecting wetlands (national and international)
  2. Conventions and treaties on wetlands of international importance
  3. Transboundary wetland management
  4. Water management on agricultural lands near wetlands
  5. Coastal wetland management practices
  6. Watershed management and wetlands conservation strategies
  7. Natural and managed wetland systems

12

9. Wetland management data plan development; need for management planning; selection criteria for managing a given wetland; stakeholder identification and involvement; identification of values; planning, zoning, monitoring

5

10. Public awareness and enlightenment: importance of creating awareness; target groups; awareness strategies; factors influencing success of awareness-raising; challenges

4

11. Wetland assessment and monitoring: purpose and wetland assessment methods

2

Practicals

30

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

60

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Group discussions and presentations
  3. Field visits

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Tests (10%)
  2. Coursework (10%)
  3. Field reports (10%)
  4. End of semester exam (70%)

Reading list:

  1. Bryony coles, English Heritage (1995).  Wetland Management.
  2. Curtis J. Richardson, Scott Bridegham (2007). Wetland Ecology and Management: Oriented approach.   Elsevier Science and Technology,
  3. D.D. (con) Hook (1988).  Ecology and Management of Wetlands.
  4. Kluwer, (2002) Wetlands ecology and management.
  5. Mary E. Kentula, Ann J Hariston (1992).  Wetlands Published by Island Press.

COURSE TITLE           : BSE 3204 CLEANER PRODUCTION

CREDIT UNIT              : 3

 

Course Description:

 

This course examines how cleaner production practices can improve the environmental performance of business while at the same time improving the competitiveness and profitability. This course is aimed at creating a win-win situation for both business and the environment while achieving the goals of sustainable development. It includes the principles, concepts and application of cleaner production practices, cleaner production assessment, implementation and continuation, tools for identifying cleaner production opportunities, policies and strategies for promoting cleaner production, cleaner production case studies and information sources.

 

Course Objectives:

  1. Identify opportunities for assistance programme to promote cleaner production in developing countries
  2. Identify the current and planned cleaner production activities and policy approaches
  3. Develop approaches for coordinating multilateral and bilateral technological cooperation and financial assistance and mechanisms to enhance private sector action.

 

Expected Learning Outcomes:

 

At the end of completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Undertake a cleaner production assessment.
  2. Implement and maintain cleaner production plans/programs.
  3. Identify the tools available for investigating cleaner production options.
  4. Identify several case studies where cleaner production has been implemented successfully.
  5. Identify sources of information on cleaner production.

 

Detailed course outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1. Evolution of cleaner production

2

2.  Benefits and barriers of implementing cleaner production

4

3. Cleaner production concepts and principles

4

5. Cleaner production assessment, implementation and continuance

4

6. Cleaner production assessment in primary industries

4

7. Environment costing

2

8.  Cleaner production assessment in major manufacturing industries

2

9.   Cleaner production assessment in major service industries

4

10.  Environmental management accounting

4

11.  Finance for cleaner technology promotion

2

12.  Green purchasing and supply chain management

4

13.  The roles and responsibilities of the private sector

4

14.  The roles and responsibilities of public authorities

3

15.  International cooperation

2

Practicals

00

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

45

 

Assessment

The overall assessment within this course of study will consist of:

i.            Course work (Take Home Essay)                                   20%

ii.            Class Test                                                        10%

iii.            Examination                                                      70%

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Group discussions and presentations
  3. Field visits

 

Reading List

  1. Cleaner production assessment in meat processing Cow consulting Engineers and Planners, United Nations.
  2. ICPIC user guide UNEP;  Program Activity Centre, United States International Cleaner Production Information Clearinghouse,
  3. U.N. Environment Programme Industry and Environment Programme Activity Centre, (1995). Cleaner Production Worldwide.
  4. United Nations Environment Programme Division of Technology Industry and Economics, United Nations 2001, First Africa Roundtable on cleaner production and sustainable consumption Nairobi Kenya, 2000

 

 

COURSE TITLE           : BSE 3205 DISASTER AND RISK MANAGEMENT

CREDIT UNIT              : 4

           

Course Description:

This course unit will introduce students to the basics models, theories, and concepts that underlie modern emergency management’s understanding of hazards and disasters. Students will examine hazard-scape, using various hazard models, with a focus on hazard mitigation and emergency management issues. The interdependence of physical, social and economic characteristics in determining vulnerability will be considered in past disasters and for future planning. The importance of hazard and risk management in a comprehensive emergency management program will also be presented.

 

Course Objectives:

The students are expected to follow four key themes of study: earth and environmental science; human science; disaster studies and emergency planning; skills and techniques modules, e.g. fieldwork, data gathering, presentation and research. Experience of geographical information systems, remote sensing and fieldwork will equip the student with specialist skills used to understand, monitor and predict natural hazards.

 

Expected Learning Outcomes:

 

At the end of the course participants should be able to:

i.            Critically examine Environmental Disaster assessment and management.

ii.            Understand and apply the principles and mechanisms of Environmental Disaster assessment and management.

iii.            Demonstrate ability in right-based Environmental Disaster assessment and management.

iv.            Undertake correct research and prepare education plan quality management reports that influence Environmental Disaster assessment and management.

 

 

 

Detailed Course outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

1. Introduction to hazard and disaster studies 

  1. Myths, Illusions, and Realities of Natural Disaster
  2. Defining hazards and disasters
  3. Terminology
  4. Continuity Sequence of related terms

8

2. Uganda’s disaster 

  1. History and future
  2. Directions and emphases in Uganda disaster reduction
  3. Developing icons of natural disaster

8

3. Hazard, Risk and Vulnerability Assessment

4

4. Seismic Hazards, Buildings and Earthquake

6

5. Hydrologic hazards

4

6. Mitigation and disaster resistance:

  1. Uganda’s National Mitigation Strategy direction
  2. Structural and Nonstructural mitigation for flood versus earthquake
  3. Pre- and Post-Disaster Mitigation Programs
  4. Planning in emergency management
  5. Preparedness – Response planning
  6. Mitigation planning

 

12

7. Geology of Earth Resources  (underlying disaster causes)

6

8. Water Resources Management (before and after disaster especially sanitation)

4

9. Geographical Information Systems (use of Remote sensing to map disaster areas.

6

10.Emergency Planning for Disasters (national, regional, international efforts)

2

Practicals

00

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

60

 

Assessment:

The overall assessment within this course of study will consist of:

i.            Course work (Take Home Essay)                                   20%

ii.            Class Test                                                        10%

iii.            Examination                                                      70%

 

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Group discussions and presentations
  3. Field visits

 

Reading List:

  1. By Keith Smith (2001) Environmental Houzards: Assessing Risk and Reducing disaster: Published by Part ledge.
  2. By Damon P. Coppola (2006) Introduction to International Disaster Management Published by Butter worth – Heinemann.
  3. Dammon P. Coppola (2007).  Intri\oduction to international disaster management. Elsevier, Inc.
  4. Ram Babu Singh (2000).  Disater Management. Published by Rawat Publication.

COURSE TITLE           : BSE 3206 ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY

CREDIT UNITS                        : 3

 

Course Description:

This course unit discusses the principles and commercial applications of biotechnology to environmental problems. The course is structured to promote self-learning and students’ development of Biotech solutions to real-life problems. Biotechnology is not just genes! Individual subject areas include the use of biotechnology to clean up or ‘bioremediate’ polluted environments as well as the economic recovery of important minerals and precious metals through ‘phytomining’. Furthermore, the application of biological systems in preventing pollution by supporting our planet’s sustainable development is also explored in subject areas such as ‘biofuels’ and ‘bioplastics’. The controversial issues of agricultural biotechnology are also examined in this course. The course is conducted by UNSW lectures and various speakers from industry, government bodies, etc., including Environment Australia, Australian Nuclear Science & Technology Organisation (ANSTO) amongst others. Assessment is in the form of a final examination with advance choice of subject areas and a company developed Environmental Impact Statement for bioremediation of a real-life environmental scenario.

 

Course Objectives:

To:

  1. Analyze public awareness of genetic engineering
  2. Explain the biochemistry and physiology of growth and metabolism
  3. Describe genetic engineering in yeasts and filamentous fungi
  4. Explain how biotechnology may be used in business
  5. Explain environmental applications of biotechnology
  6. Explain environmental applications of biotechnology

 

Expected Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course participants should be able to:

i.            Critically examine Environmental Biotechnology

ii.            Demonstrate ability in right-based Environmental Biotechnology

iii.            Undertake correct research and prepare education plan quality management reports that influence Environmental Biotechnology.

 

Detailed Course outline:

 

TOPIC

CH

  1. Public perception of biotechnology
  1. Public awareness of genetic engineering
  2. Regulatory requirements-safety of genetically engineered foods
  3. Policy making
  4. Areas of significant public concern

 

 

9
  1. Genetic engineering: yeasts and filamentous fungi                                                                                                                                                                        11hrs
  1. Filamentous fungi
  2. Introducing DNA into fungi
  3. Gene cloning
  4. Gene structure, organization and expression
  5. Biotechnological applications of fungi

 

10
  1. Biochemistry and physiology of growth and metabolism
  1. Metabolism
  2. Catabolic pathways
  3. Cluconeogenisis
  4. Energy production in aerobic and anaerobic, micro-organisms, metabolism, biosynthesis, control of metabolic processes, efficiency of microbial growth

 

10

  1. Down stream processing: a multistage operation                                                                                                                         10hrs
  1. Solid-liquid separation
  2. Release of intracellular components
  3. Concentrating biological products
  4. Purification by chromatography
  5. Product formulation
  6. Monitoring of downstream processing
  7. Process integration

 

12

  1. The business of biotechnology
  1. What is biotechnology used for?
  2. Biotechnology companies, their care and nurturing
  3. Investment in biotechnology
  4. Who needs management
  5. Patents and biotechnology

 

10

  1. Environmental applications                                                                                                                        10hrs
  1. Treatment of waste water
  2. Digestion of organic slurries
  3. Treatment of solid wastes
  4. Treatment of waste gases
  5. Soil remediation
  6. Treatment of groundwater

 

Practicals

9

TOTAL CONTACT HOURS

45

 

Teaching and Learning Methods:

  1. Lectures
  2. Discussions
  3. Field trips

Modes of Delivery:

  1. Lectures
  2. Group discussions and presentations
  3. Field visits

 

Modes of Assessment:

  1. Coursework (20%)
  2. Presentations (10%)
  3. End of semester exam (70%)

 

 

 

 

Reading List:

 

  1.          i.      Hans – Joachim, Josef Winter (2006). Environmental Biotechnology: Concepts and Applications Wiley – VCH.
  2.        ii.      Josbe de la Terre, Jose de la Torre, Bruce E. Rittmann, (2001). Environmental Biotechnology: Principles and Applications McGrew – Hill. Alan H. Sc
  1. qragg (1999). Environmental Biotechnology Longman.
  2. Lawrence K. Wang, Joo-Hwa tay, Volodymyr Ivanor, Yung-Ise Hung (2010). Environmental Biotechnology Published by Humana Press.
  3. Gareth G. Evans, Judy Furlong (2011).  Environmental Biotechnology: Theory and Applications.  John Wiley & Sons Ltd.