Is COVID-19 helping to rise digital platforms and advanced technologies for working from home?

Is COVID-19 helping to rise digital platforms and advanced technologies for working from home?

Is COVID-19 helping to rise digital platforms and advanced technologies for working from home? 1

In current years, there has been increasing focus on the question of how to balance work and life commitments in both academic and political debates. Working from home is one resourcefulness that has been encouraged as a way of enlightening the work–lifecycle sense of balance and to reduce the fast spread of the new epidemic of Coronavirus that has increasingly affected all companies worldwide leading to many deaths of people who are employees and company owners as well as an economic downfall in all countries all around the world since its wide spread in the early months of the year 2020. Its wide spread, led to invention of new policies and guidelines by governments to people, organizations and companies in most countries, for example, that involved closure of schools and lockdown of hangout places like bars and clubs, as well as a policy to step up work and businesses to remote management adapting digital platforms for working from home.

The Advanced Technologies

If some mass media intelligences are to be believed, the world of work is set to be hit by an absolute digital tsunami, devastating our present prejudices about employment. A considerable percentage of the jobs we know today will be concentrated obsolete by the latest generation of robots and their newfound dimensions to achieve tasks such as printing 3D objects, translating documents, drafting insurance policies, taking care of elderly people in their homes, telling doctors what might be wrong with patients and many more, each more surprising than the last. The very concept of a ‘job’ may become old-fashioned and swapped by an ever-shifting portfolio of commissions and projects assigned through online platforms, with the ‘Urbanization’ of work lying just around the corner. Similar dissertations about the inferences of mechanization for jobs – whether pessimistic or optimistic in tone – have been articulated many times before, with the argument often rekindled by ground-breaking technological progresses. In the early 1980s, as the Fordist model of the economy became ever more deeply engulfed in controversy, the appearance of the first microprocessors and personal computers in workplaces waved the flames of speculation about job losses. Around the turn of the epoch, the explosion in use of the Internet – at the same time as the bubble of interest in the somewhat vaguely titled ‘e-economy or electronic economy’ – led to imagining about the pick-up in growth which would call for unparalleled levels of elasticity on the part of workers. Prodigious leaps made recently in the fields of robotics, communicating objects, big data processing and virtual platforms have placed a question mark over the significance and endurance of the social model of paid employment. In the meantime, digital technologies have become an integral and familiar feature of our day-to-day lives at work and at home; the Manichean view of technology as either a blessing or a curse which was popular 30 years ago has fallen out of favor, particularly among younger people.

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